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Target Field is Ready for its All-Star Close-Up
With the All-Star game coming to the Twin Cities, the Minnesota Twins see the mid-summer party as more than a way to distract from another disappointing season. In some ways, it's a referendum on the success of outdoor baseball in the chilly north country and the first chance 5-year-old Target Field has had to take center stage. The Twins' new urban jewel of a ballpark opened in 2010 but has hosted only one postseason series. So team officials are looking forward to putting the ballpark - and yes, the weather - on display. ''One of the greatest things about All-Star week is it's going to be a showcase for the nation that this isn't necessarily the ice box 12 months of the year that people think it is,'' Twins President Dave St. Peter said.
-Raiders in Talks to Tear Down Coliseum Despite A's Deals
-Wrigley Field Renovation Unanimously Approved

Wrigley Field Renovation Unanimously Approved
The Chicago Cubs won unanimous approval from the Commission on Chicago Landmarks today for an ambitious $575 million remake of Wrigley Field. The new plan expands on last year’s proposal to renovate the 100-year-old stadium and surrounding areas and calls for seven advertising signs in the outfield, instead of two signs, including a Jumbotron-like video board in left field. After reducing the plan for the video board from 5,700 square feet to 4,452 square feet, Cubs officials recommended to the landmarks commission an even smaller size Thursday of 3,990 square feet.
-Raiders in Talks to Tear Down Coliseum Despite A's Deals
-Braves, Cobb detail stadium construction schedule

A's Sign Lease with O.co Coliseum for 10 years
The Oakland Athletics will be playing in O.co Coliseum for the next 10 years, the club announced in a press release Thursday. The talk of perhaps moving to San Jose or elsewhere is effectively put to bed and from the sounds of things, the A's won't be getting a new stadium in Oakland for at least 10 years."After much diligence and cooperation from both parties, we are delighted to make this announcement today," said A's Owner Lew Wolff in a statement. "We believe this agreement works well for city and county taxpayers, the team, A's fans and all involved. It provides stability for the A's while also improving fan and player experience with significant upgrades and improvements at the facility."
-Cubs plan more Wrigley signs amid fight with rooftop owners
-Braves, Cobb detail stadium construction schedule

Braves Release Renderings of New Ballpark
The Atlanta Braves released on Wednesday conceptual drawings of their planned 41,000-plus seat Cobb County Stadium. The images show a stadium with least four decks and a broad sun canopy with gathering places for fans. It also provides a glimpse at the design concepts behind the $400 million mixed-use complex to sit around the ballpark. “This is a very early look at how our vision is shaping up and, even though we are still months away from final plans and drawings, we are very pleased with the progress,” said Braves President John Schuerholz, said in a news release. “The renderings represent the sense of place we intend to create 365 days a year in addition to a world-class ballpark.”
-Emmett to host 'family chat' to discuss Astrodome
-Work on Historic League Park nears finish in Cleveland

-Braves, Cobb detail stadium construction schedule

GSU Wants to Turn Turner Field into Football Stadium
Georgia State is proposing repurposing Turner Field into a 30,000-seat football stadium and building another baseball stadium that will include Hank Aaron’s wall as part of the structure. University President Dr. Mark Becker and Atlanta real estate development firm Carter provided the Atlanta Journal-Constitution an exclusive look at the proposal on Wednesday. The idea is more than just stadiums. They want to be partners in building an estimated $300 million development that will include retail, residential and student housing and will be paid for through a mix of public and private funds.
-Emmett to host 'family chat' to discuss Astrodome
-Work on Historic League Park nears finish in Cleveland

-Braves, Cobb detail stadium construction schedule

Ivy, Brick Walls: Celebrating 100 Years of Wrigley Field
Wood can burn, but brick, concrete and steel beams do not. And in 1914, fire was a big deal, especially in Chicago. When Charles Weeghman, owner of the Chicago Federals, called architect Zachary Taylor Davis in 1914, flammability was foremost on his mind. Weeghman was looking for a new venue for his new team in its new league, and Davis was well known for designing Chicago’s other baseball stadium, Comiskey Park, which had been built without the extensive use of fire-happy wood. For Weegham, the goal was to create a stadium that would last, at least for longer than a few years. So the new baseball stadium at the corner of Addison and Sheffield streets in north Chicago served as the emergence of a baseball stadium design trend, at least in Chicago.
-New York MLS Team to Play at Yankee Stadium
-Work on Historic League Park nears finish in Cleveland

-Braves, Cobb detail stadium construction schedule

Marquee at Wrigley Field a Beloved Relic
It stands out on the corner of Clark and Addison, its bright red color and bold white letters welcoming you to the home of the Cubs. That home, Wrigley Field, is many things -- its iconic scoreboard, lush green ivy and 100 years of memories -- but the moment you know you've truly arrived at the Friendly Confines is the first glimpse of the marquee above the main entrance. The marquee hasn't been a part of Wrigley Field's entire 100-year history -- this season is only its 80th -- but it's as much a part of the ballpark's fabric as the sound of organ music and smell of Old Style. How a simple sign has become so beloved is through the passage of time, much in the same way Wrigley Field has endeared itself to baseball fans. "It feels authentic to people," said Stuart Shea, author of "Wrigley Field: The Long Life and Contentious Times of the Friendly Confines."
-Arlington and its ballpark mark a milestone with Rangers
-Mets' ballpark revenues drop for the fourth straight year

Owner says Changes at Coors Field "Pizazz it Up"
Dick Monfort passionately wants Coors Field to be the crown jewel of major-league ballparks. That was evident Wednesday afternoon as the Rockies owner conducted a media tour of The Rooftop, the stunning new party deck high above right field. "The sightlines are truly incredible, and I think the food and amenities are top of the line," said Monfort, unabashedly proud of the views, brews and food that come with the $10 million addition to the ballpark at 20th and Blake. "Our fans love the park, but we know that with all of the TV now, sometimes it's easier to just stay home and watch a game. But we want people to come to the ballpark. It's important for our competitive edge to have a lot of people here cheering."
-Arlington and its ballpark mark a milestone with Rangers
-Mets' ballpark revenues drop for the fourth straight year
-Over 50,000 turn out for MLB at Olympic Stadium Saturday

-Wrigley Field Turns 100, and Other Milestones Arriving in 2014
-Escaping Astrodoom? Why the derletict Astrodome sits in limbo

Baseball Returns to Montreal's Olmypic Stadium
If you mourned the demise of the Expos, the buzz of activity at Olympic Stadium on Wednesday would have warmed your heart — or tugged at your heart strings. Maybe both. Workers milled about the stadium, on the pitcher’s mound, at second base, and in one of the newly rebuilt players’ dugouts where fresh paint signs hung from the railings. The field is being converted from a soccer pitch to a baseball diamond for two hotly anticipated exhibition games this weekend between the Toronto Blue Jays and New York Mets. It’s the first time Major League Baseball has returned to Montreal since the league moved the troubled Expos franchise to Washington in 2005.
-Tigers add new security measures at ballpark
-Detroit Outlines New Vision For Old Tiger Stadium Site
-No Easy Task Preparing US Cellular Field for Opener

Wrigley Field Turns 100! See Historic Park, Then & Now!
Wrigley Field is about to turn a century old—the storied stadium will celebrate its 100th birthday on April 23. When it was built in 1914, the ballpark—then called Weeghman Park after the Chicago Federals owner Charles Weeghman—was one level and seated 14,000. At first, the stadium hosted the Federals, who later became known as the Chicago Whales. Then when the Federal League folded in 1915, a group of investors, including chewing gum magnate William Wrigley Jr., bought the Chicago Cubs and moved them to Weeghman Park. The stadium was renamed Cubs Park before getting its permanent name, Wrigley Field, in 1926.
-Tigers add new security measures at ballpark
-Detroit Outlines New Vision For Old Tiger Stadium Site
-No Easy Task Preparing US Cellular Field for Opener

Would Angels Be Willing to Build Own Ballpark?
Is Arte Moreno bluffing, or would he really move the Angels out of Anaheim? That has emerged as a pivotal question as the team and city try to negotiate a deal that would keep the Angels where they are. Moreno, the Angels’ owner, met last month with officials in Tustin about a possible new ballpark there, and said talks with Anaheim officials were “at a stalemate.” Dan Barrett, a sports industry consultant advising the city, told the Anaheim City Council on Tuesday night that a new ballpark could cost $600 million to $700 million. After the meeting, Mayor Tom Tait expressed skepticism that Moreno could strike his best financial deal by abandoning Angel Stadium.
-Coors Field closer to hosting outdoor hockey game
-Astrodome supporters fighting the good fight

-Wrigley Field groundbreaking was 100 years ago

Giants Willing to Share AT&T Park with Oakland A's
With the Oakland A's filing into Scottsdale Stadium for the Cactus League opener, Giants president and CEO Larry Baer acknowledged Wednesday that he could see the two Bay Area teams sharing AT&T Park at some point, but only under one circumstance. "They've got to come up with a long-term plan," Baer said. "Once that's arrived at, then maybe you'll take a step back and say, 'Is there something we can do to be helpful?' As a neighborly thing. "Obviously, they've got to come up with what their plan is and we'll go from there." If the A's need a temporary home as they build a new ballpark, the Giants are open to discussions. But Baer said that there is nothing new on the A's stadium front. He reiterated that the Giants would like the A's to get their own stadium, but not if it's in San Jose. The Giants hold territorial rights in Santa Clara County and have been unwilling to budge.
-Giants hope to bring the Sharks and outdoor hockey to AT&T Park
-Could Angels put Irvine into play for stadium?

-Explosives take down more parts of the Metrodome

Rangers' Stadium Renamed Globe Life Park in Arlington
The Texas Rangers have announced Globe Life, an insurance company, has purchased the naming rights for their stadium in Arlington. The stadium will now be known as Globe Life Park in Arlington.
Globe Life will also make a "substantial commitment" to the Texas Rangers Baseball Foundation to support youth baseball and softball programs in the Rangers’ five-state territory through a grant partnership program, according to Texas Rangers co-chariman Ray Davis. Globe Life and Accident Insurance Company, founded in 1951, is based out of Oklahoma City, Okla., and has over 3.9 million policyholders, according to its website. It is a subsidiary of Torchmark Corporation, based in McKinney, and has 650 employees in McKinney and Oklahoma City. “This agreement makes us a stronger organization--on the field and in our community," said Rangers Co-Chairmen Ray Davis and Bob Simpson in a statement released to media. "It will give us increased flexibility and help us remain competitive from both short-term and long-term perspectives."

-At Yankee Stadium, Rangers Will Share Glamour With Rivals
-SoCal Heat Not Fazing Ice Rink at Dodger Stadium

Braves Select Architect Populus to Design Stadium
The Atlanta Braves have selected the most prolific designer of Major League Baseball stadiums as lead architect for the team’s planned new ballpark in Cobb County.
The Braves’ choice is Kansas City-based Populous, which designed 19 of the 30 MLB stadiums currently in use, a team official confirmed Tuesday. The Braves are in contract negotiations with the firm, team spokeswoman Beth Marshall added. Populous, formerly named HOK Sport, is known for its retro-style ballparks, a trend the firm pioneered with Baltimore’s highly acclaimed Oriole Park at Camden Yards, which opened in 1992. In recent years, Populous designed a range of baseball stadiums, including Marlins Park in Miami, Target Field in Minneapolis and stadiums in New York for the Yankees and Mets.

-At Yankee Stadium, Rangers Will Share Glamour With Rivals
-SoCal Heat Not Fazing Ice Rink at Dodger Stadium

The Outdoor Hockey Success Continues for the NHL
Question whether the league is overplaying its outdoor hand, there is no denying that after a weekend that saw the NHL go outdoors not once but twice in a span of less than 24 hours and 3,000 miles apart that the NHL scored a bigger win than the Rangers did Sunday. After seeing the Winter Classic this year in Michigan with more than 100,000 fans in attendance, the snow flying from start to finish and two Original Six teams doing battle, it seemed almost pointless to repeat the outdoor feat for the NHL. No way could the watered-down games compare to the New Year's Day staple, especially if we were going to get watered-down ice by going to a locale such as Los Angeles. Then the NHL actually hosted games at Dodger Stadium and Yankee Stadium and they went off about as well as the NHL could have hoped.
-At Yankee Stadium, Rangers Will Share Glamour With Rivals
-SoCal Heat Not Fazing Ice Rink at Dodger Stadium

It's History: Metrodome Roof Deflated in 35 Minutes
I
n the end, the old workhorse exhaled its last breath, sagged in the middle and collapsed with a silent and steady heave. It took just 35 minutes Saturday to deflate the Metrodome’s signature fabric roof, providing both a symbolic end of an era as well as a meaningful start to the construction on the new $1 billion Vikings stadium in its place. By April, all traces of the Dome will be erased from the Minneapolis skyline, replaced by a glassy new behemoth in 2016. The scheduled deflation went without a hitch, despite nagging worries about wind and adverse winter weather. Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority Vice Chairman Bill McCarthy called it “a sad and exciting day at the same time. I don’t want to forget what this building has meant to many of us, the Vikings, Twins and Gophers fans and the many high school and college games that have been played here.”
-Closing of the Metrodome: A lot of great Twins memories
-SoCal Heat Not Fazing Ice Rink at Dodger Stadium

Dodgers Unveil More Upgrades to Dodger Stadium
The Dodgers will continue the upgrades on Dodger Stadium that began last winter, including an expansion of the Field Level entrances and relocation of the visiting clubhouse. Plans have been submitted for approval by the city of Los Angeles for the second phase of the project, which is expected to be completed in time for the regular-season home opener April 4. "Dodger Stadium is one of the most fan-friendly and family-oriented venues in all of baseball," said Dodgers president and CEO Stan Kasten in a team release. "Our goal is to ensure that we maintain that elite status while continuing to do everything in our power to bring a world championship to Dodger fans."
-The Hidden Relics of Candlestick Park
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Giants memories remain at Candlestick Park

-Closing of the Metrodome: A lot of great Twins memories
-NHL Stadium Series: Ticket prices lowered for Dodger Stadium game

Oakland Ballpark Backers Tout Waterfront Site
Imagine AT&T Park flanked by giant shipping cranes - that's pretty much the vision A's boosters have for a 38,000-seat ballpark at the Port of Oakland, just west of Jack London Square. The $500 million waterfront ballpark is being proposed by a team led by Clorox chairman and CEO Don Knauss and former Dreyer's Grand Ice Cream boss T. Gary Rogers - with the blessing of Oakland Mayor Jean Quan. "It's one of the two sites we promised Major League Baseball we would offer, and it will be available early next year," Quan told us Friday - the other being the current Coliseum site. "Trust me, Oakland is hot now," Quan said, "and a lot of developers would love that (waterfront) site if it doesn't become a baseball stadium."
-The Hidden Relics of Candlestick Park
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Giants memories remain at Candlestick Park
-Closing of the Metrodome: A lot of great Twins memories
-Oakland ballpark backers tout waterfront site

Metrodome to Deflate for Last Time on January 18th
The Metrodome roof will deflate for the last time next month. Mortenson Construction, the contractor building the new Minnesota Vikings stadium, says Friday it will cut the Metrodome's power on Jan. 18. Company vice president John Wood says the first step after that is to deflate the Teflon and fiberglass roof. The Metrodome's facilities manager tells Minnesota Public Radio News he expects the deflation to only take about 30 minutes. The roof fabric will be cut into small pieces and possibly recycled. Preliminary work has started around the Metrodome, where its replacement will be constructed. The Vikings plan two seasons at the University of Minnesota's stadium. The Minnesota Twins moved out of the Metrdome and into Target Field in April 2010.

Rays Plan Ballpark Improvements for Tropicana Field
The Tampa Bay Rays announced plans Dec. 3 for a major upgrade to Tropicana Field that will significantly enhance the fan experience for the 2014 season. The project will create 360-degree pedestrian circulation around the lower seating bowl at Tropicana Field. The improved circulation will provide easier access to and from ballpark gates, concessions and activity areas throughout the facility. Existing cross-aisles in the lower bowl will be extended from the left and right field foul poles to create a walkway lined with drink rails as it winds toward center field.  "These renovations reflect our constant commitment to providing a first-class gameday experience at Tropicana Field," said Rays Principal Owner Stuart Sternberg. "A visit to the ballpark will be even more enjoyable because of these new features and attractions."
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Rangers get OK for $4 million in ballpark renovations
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Sen. Levin calls Old Tiger Stadium and its legendary players a 'magnet' for redevelopment
-Athletics extend Coliseum lease through 2015

Nationals Sought Tax Money for Retractable Roof
Mayor Vincent C. Gray said Tuesday that Washington Nationals owner Theodore N. Lerner pitched him earlier this year on a pricey plan to have the city build a retractable roof over Nationals Park — a proposal, Gray said, that he swiftly but politely rejected. The private one-on-one meeting took place in the John A. Wilson Building in mid-July and lasted about 15 minutes, Gray said. “What Lerner wanted to talk about was the possibility of a roof on Nationals Park,” the mayor (D) said. “That was it. There was no discussion about how much it was going to cost and no further details. I’ve had no further discussions.”
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Taxpayers on the hook for stadium costs
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Sen. Levin calls Old Tiger Stadium and its legendary players a 'magnet' for redevelopment
-Athletics extend Coliseum lease through 2015

Braves Plan to Build New Stadium by 2017
The Atlanta Braves plan to build a new stadium in Cobb County and move there from Turner Field at the start of the 2017 season, team officials said today. Braves executives John Schuerholz, Mike Plant and Derek Schiller, in a meeting with a small group of reporters, said the new ballpark will be built at the northwest intersection of I-75 and I-285 in the Galleria/Cumberland Mall area. They said the team has “secured” 60 acres of land for the project. The Braves said the stadium is projected to cost $672 million, including parking, land and infrastructure, and will be built in partnership with Cobb County.
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Turner Field to be demolished after Braves leave
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Reaction to Braves moving
-Beach Bowl to Make Debut at Marlins Park Next Year

Demolition Likely for Astrodome After Voters Nix Plan
Houston-area voters have rejected a plan to convert the shuttered Astrodome into a convention center and have likely doomed the iconic stadium to demolition. Tuesday’s referendum would have authorized Harris County to issue up to $217 million in bonds to turn the world’s first multipurpose domed stadium into a giant convention and exhibition space. Early voting returns, as of 9:30 p.m., favor razing the so-called “Eighth Wonder of the World” with 53 percent of the vote going against the referendum. With 67 percent of the precincts reporting in, 89,455 voted against approving the referendum, while 102,708 in favor. Early voting totals also favored razing the facility with 47,190 voting for the referendum and 54,721 voting against.
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Rooftop owners: Wrigley Field test sign obstructs views
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Playoff preparations under way at Tropicana Field
-Beach Bowl to Make Debut at Marlins Park Next Year

Rockies Reveal Renovation Plan for Coors Field
The Rockies and the Denver Metropolitan Stadium District announced Wednesday the next major construction project at Coors Field — an extensive redesign and renovation to the upper right-field seating area and concourse. According to the Rockies, the new party deck area will embrace a "LoDo" theme that includes views of the Rocky Mountains from a rooftop urban setting. Owner Dick Monfort told The Denver Post on Wednesday that much of the money for the project came from a surplus of capital construction funds and also from money the Rockies and the Denver Metropolitan Stadium District received from Aramark and RTD. Aramark is the company that runs the food and beverage concessions at Coors Field. "It's an investment that will help in years to come," Monfort said. "The money is not fungible. It couldn't have been spent on players (because it is connected to stadium improvement). It's one-time money. If we did our work right, it will be something that will generate revenue that can go into the team forever. There are returns."
-Astrodome gets $8 million facelift regardless of fate

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Playoff preparations under way at Tropicana Field
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O.co Coliseum Quick-Change Artists on the Spot

Playoff Run Could Fuel Ballpark in Oakland
Not to put any more pressure on you, Athletics, but there's more at stake in Thursday's game against the Tigers than simply a trip to the American League Championship Series. The future of the ballclub in Oakland might hang in the balance. None of you guys was born and raised in Oakland, and even if the team moves to San Jose, most of you won't be around by the time the move is made, so this might not be at the top of your worry list. But before Thursday night's game, feel free to ignore the advice of team co-owner Lew Wolff, look into the stands, all the way up to the tarpland now filled with real people, and think of the Oakland fans. Think of the city that has been good to the A's and baseball for many decades, a city that could use a break. A slam-bang series against the dreaded Red Sox, especially if it leads to a World Series, might be the tipping point in keeping the A's in Oakland, in a new ballpark. Why would one game, or a couple of thrilling weeks in the postseason, make a difference in the geographical fate of the A's? Well, the people who make the decisions on ballparks - citizens, politicians, investors - are human, with some exceptions. They get caught up in waves of emotion.
-Astrodome gets $8 million facelift regardless of fate

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Playoff preparations under way at Tropicana Field
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O.co Coliseum Quick-Change Artists on the Spot

O.co Coliseum Quick-Change Artists on the Spot
This will be a big weekend at O.co Coliseum for those who excel at speed, strength, agility and veteran savvy. The A's and Raiders games should be interesting, too. In the 221/2 (or so) hours that will separate Saturday night's Game 2 of the A's-Detroit Tigers playoff series and Sunday night's Raiders-San Diego Chargers regular-season NFL game, a crew of several dozen workers and a couple of huge cranes will transform the Coliseum from a house of baseball into the Black Hole. The quick turnaround may seem like a daunting, stressful challenge, but there's a reason these workers seem to subscribe to the old sports axiom, "Act like you've been there before." The Coliseum, built in an era when multipurpose facilities were as fashionable as garage bands and bell bottom pants, is the last remaining stadium that is home to teams from Major League Baseball and the National Football League. Under ideal conditions, it takes a couple of days to switch configurations from one sport to the other.
-Oakland A's owner Lew Wolff makes pitch for downtown ballpark
-Wrigley Field Renovations in Limbo

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Depressing Crowds at Pennant Chasing Ballparks
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Worst Case Scenario Comes True at Busch Stadium

San Francisco Has Had Run of Eccentric Ballparks
Candlestick Park is about to go out with a bang. Soon after the last 49ers game, demolition crews will place charges throughout the stadium, someone will push a button and the great concrete bowl off Jamestown Avenue will implode, an arena that produced 53 years of memories collapsing in just 30 seconds.  Giants fans in particular loved to hate the Stick, with its notorious wind, rowdy patrons and rough environs. But Candlestick was actually one of the tamer entries in a long, proud tradition of weird and wonderful San Francisco ballparks. The first mention of something like baseball in San Francisco took place in 1852, when the Daily Alta California ran an item about "full grown persons engaged very industriously in the game known as town ball." Town ball was the precursor of baseball, a bat-and-ball game played on a square where the players frequently made up their own rules. Even when the game got rules, this lax attitude toward authority and decorous behavior was to continue in San Francisco.
-Oakland A's owner Lew Wolff makes pitch for downtown ballpark
-With Royals’ best season in a decade, attendance at Kauffman Stadium edges up

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Depressing Crowds at Pennant Chasing Ballparks
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Worst Case Scenario Comes True at Busch Stadium

Blue Jays to Host Mets in Games at Olympic Stadium
Baseball is coming back to Olympic Stadium in Montreal. The Toronto Blue Jays will host the New York Mets at Olympic Stadium on March 28-29, 2014 in two pre-season games just before the regular season begins. "We are excited to bring the Blue Jays to Montreal play in Montreal and give the fans a taste of Major League Baseball again. This will be a very meaningful experience knowing the strength and passion of baseball fans in Quebec. We hope that these games will rekindle their interest in the Blue Jays and Major League Baseball," said Toronto Blue Jays president and CEO Paul Beeston. The two teams have faced each other 21 times with the Mets leading the series, 15-6. The Blue Jays have been the home team on 12 occasions, winning six and losing six. The last game between the Jays and the Mets goes back to May 20, 2012, when the Mets won 6-5, at Rogers Centre.
-Jays turf Argos in favor of grass playing surface at Rogers Centre
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Man dies after fall from upper deck of Atlanta ballpark

-MLB Plans to Intervene in Rays Stadium Dispute
-Seating Chart released for NHL Game at Dodger Stadium

Anaheim OKs Angels Lease Talks Amid Mention of Move
As the Anaheim City Council voted Tuesday to enter formal lease negotiations with the Angels, a consultant representing the city said owner Arte Moreno has emphasized he has the means to move the team elsewhere. By a 4-1 vote, with Mayor Tom Tait in opposition, the City Council voted to allow the Angels to opt out of their current stadium lease as late as 2019, rather than the current date of 2016. "The owner of the Angels has made clear in our discussions he has the resources and willingness to build his own stadium," said city consultant Charles Black, president of CB Urban Development in San Diego. Black also told the council the Angels could move to Irvine, Irwindale or "at least half a dozen potential sites" in downtown Los Angeles. After the meeting, Black said Moreno had not mentioned specific alternative sites in the talks with Anaheim. Angels President John Carpino declined to comment when asked whether team officials had held discussions with other cities.
-Visiting ballparks can become a lifelong hobby, travel opportunity
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Man dies after fall from upper deck of Atlanta ballpark

-MLB Plans to Intervene in Rays Stadium Dispute
-Seating Chart released for NHL Game at Dodger Stadium

Recorded Selections Replacing Organists at Ballparks
With a runner on first, the Pirates infielders and audio engineer were ready for a double play. The Buccos converted, and that was Mic Connolly's cue to blare "Double Vision" by Foreigner throughout PNC Park. The people staffing the in-game entertainment room sit 101 feet above the field -- far above the flying hot dogs and the sprinting Jalapeno Hannah. But they were also closely tuned in, prepared to match music to game situations using a computer, audio editor and other tools. They played everything from Jewish folk classic "Hava Nagila" to the pop hit "TiK ToK." Baseball music has come a long way since the organ. At PNC Park, the organ music is all prerecorded, and there's less than there used to be. The evolution of ballpark music here and throughout the major leagues reflects broad shifts in technology and American culture. Since the 1860s, there has been live music at baseball games. In those days, bands provided the entertainment, according to Tim Wiles, director of research at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, N.Y.

-Visiting ballparks can become a lifelong hobby, travel opportunity
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Man dies after fall from upper deck of Atlanta ballpark

-MLB Plans to Intervene in Rays Stadium Dispute
-Seating Chart released for NHL Game at Dodger Stadium

Voters Will Decide Fate of the Astrodome
Picture: Houston Chronicle
Voters will have the final say on the fate of the Houston Astrodome. The Astrodome, opened in 1965 as the world's first multipurpose domed sports stadium, will have a chance for a new life this fall. Harris County commissioners approved a measure Tuesday for the Nov. 5 ballot that will ask voters to authorize up to $217 million in bonds to renovate the Astrodome. If approved, the ballot measure would turn the Astrodome into a giant convention center and exhibition space. The commissioners said Tuesday that voters must understand that approving the measure would lead to a small increase in property tax. That tax increase amounts to a half-cent per $100 of assessed value, which the owner of a home valued at $200,000 would see the tax bill increase by about $8 per year. County Judge Ed Emmett said Tuesday that the measure allows the public to decide the building's future. "In my six years as county judge, it comes up in almost every speech, 'What are you going to do with the Astrodome?' It will be a fascinating process to watch," Emmett told The Associated Press. Tax breaks, naming rights and other incentives could eventually lower the project's cost, and officials say that the final figure on the ballot is expected to be lower than $217 million.
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Visiting ballparks can become a lifelong hobby, travel opportunity

-Man dies after fall from upper deck of Atlanta ballpark

Playing the Stadium Name Game
Corporate names are plastered on so many sports stadiums that fans have to scratch hard to find a building that lacks one. Airlines, banks, energy providers and technology companies are among the most willing to spend millions of dollars a year to get their names in front of fans.
The Dallas Cowboys, along with the Yankees, the Red Sox and the Cubs, were some of the most prominent teams without a naming rights partner. That changed last week when the Cowboys said that their home field would become AT&T Stadium. Jerry Jones, the team’s owner, acknowledged that the Cowboys had not set a record. The deal is believed to be worth as much as $19 million a year, short of the $20 million the Mets and the Nets receive. The recession dampened the market for naming rights deals, and the fact that the Cowboys — sometimes called America’s Team — could not garner more money than the Mets and the Nets suggests that the market has a way to go before reaching new heights. Congressional scrutiny of naming rights deals involving banks has hurt, too.
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Dodgers Unveil New Trick To Keep Ballpark Beer Cold
-MLS president: Yankee Stadium, Queens still possible for NYCFC

-MORRISSEY: Time to let go of past at Wrigley Field

Chicago Approves Renovation Plan of Wrigley Field
It's gonna happen. That is, the changes that have been proposed to massively renovate Wrigley Field -- home of the Chicago Cubs, in case any non-baseball fans have ventured in here -- with upwards of $500 million worth of upgrades. The Chicago city council approved the proposal Wednesday, per the Associated Press, which was necessary due to the landmark status of several park features in addition to zoning issues and an agreement with across-the-street rooftop owners. The proposal includes a 5,700-square-foot Jumbotron in left field. This has been the biggest issue throughout the process, as the rooftop owners currently have a deal to give 17 percent of their revenue to the Cubs, considering they are making money off the Cubs' product. Their worry is having views blocked. Alderman Tom Tunney has been doing most of the fighting for his constituents. "I cannot support a proposal that so dramatically affects the quality of life of my residents," Tunney said (AP) several weeks ago.
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Dodgers Unveil New Trick To Keep Ballpark Beer Cold
-MLS president: Yankee Stadium, Queens still possible for NYCFC

-MORRISSEY: Time to let go of past at Wrigley Field

Citi Field and the new Paradigm of Ballpark Design
Drew Hallowell
At the risk of seeming terribly reductionist, I would like to suggest that we have seen five eras of ballpark design in Major League Baseball. In the Utilitarian Era (1876-1908), the goal was simply to lay out some grounds and throw up a grandstand quickly, and somewhere close to a center of population. With many franchises operating on a shoestring and just hoping to get through the season without missing the payroll, there was little money for infrastructure investments. You would build a wooden grandstand to seat a few thousand bugs, it would burn down after someone dropped a lit cigar in a bucketful of oily rags, and then you'd do it again. In the Classic Era (1909-1960), owners took pride in their ballparks, which were seen as a reflection of the owners themselves. Ballparks were intended to inspire the customers and enhance their perceptions, in the same vein as art museums and Carnegie libraries and ornate banks. Simply by stepping inside such edifices, you would become a better human being. That was the idea, anyway. The era was inaugurated in 1909 by Philadelphia's hibe Park,, the first steel-and-concrete ballpark.
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Charms of Citi Field to be showcased at All-Star Game
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When Shea Stadium was the Stadium of the Future
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Nostalgia for Tiger Stadium blamed for lack of development at site

-Plan Commission endorses Wrigley Field rehab plan

New Wrigley Field Videoboard Clears Key Hurdle
The Chicago Cubs have won a key endorsement to put up a giant video board and oversize advertising sign that would rise above the outfield walls of Wrigley Field, two key revenue generators for the team as part of its plan to renovate the ballpark. Thursday's 6-0 approval of the two structures by the Landmarks Commission, which must sign off on alterations to the historically protected features of the 99-year-old ballpark, now clears the way for the Plan Commission and City Council to consider the team's full $500 million plan to not only renovate Wrigley Field, but also redevelop surrounding land in the Wrigleyville neighborhood with a hotel and an office-retail complex. The 5,700-square-foot Jumbotron-like screen to be placed atop the rear wall of left field will be nearly three times the size of Wrigley's famous old-fashioned scoreboard in center field. With a horizontal script sign on top and new night lights, it would be 60 feet tall and 95 feet wide. The three-panel video screen itself would be 95 feet wide and 48 feet tall.
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Charms of Citi Field to be showcased at All-Star Game
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Somehow A's have found way to win in an outdated park and brutal market
-MLB rejects San Jose's mayor's request to discuss ballpark for A's

-Wrigley Field Clock, Outfield Walls Could Get Ads

A's Owner on Stadium: "It's All a Bunch of Crap"
The Oakland Athletics stadium plight stinks to the high heavens, but, of course, A's owner Lew Wolff didn't need a massive raw sewage leak Sunday to realize that. Wolff was already at his Los Angeles office by sunrise Monday morning, answering the telephone, apologizing to the Seattle Mariners, complaining to Major League Baseball officials, talking to stadium authorities, and looking for a private place to cry. "It's all a bunch of crap,'' Wolff told USA TODAY Sports, who wasn't laughing at the pun. "It's a sad situation. "I'm not the one in charge of raw sewage. "Then again, maybe I am.'' Wolff wants to be talking about his team on the field, not the raw sewage that forced his own team, and the Mariners, to shower together in the Oakland Raiders' clubhouse. He wants to bask in the spotlight of having the best team in baseball over the last 162 games, going 99-55 alone since July 1, 2012, a whopping 17 games better than the powerful Texas Rangers in the American League West.
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Weekend in January might feature outdoor games at Dodger Stadium and Yankee Stadium
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Somehow A's have found way to win in an outdated park and brutal market
-MLB rejects San Jose's mayor's request to discuss ballpark for A's

-Blue Jays Open to Playing a Home Game in Montreal

Dodger Stadium to Host a Doubleheader: Soccer
The Galaxy and Real Madrid are among four teams that will play in a doubleheader Aug. 3 at Dodger Stadium as part of a new international soccer tournament, officials confirmed Wednesday. Juventus of Italy and Everton FC of England also will participate in the first soccer matches ever held at the 51-year-old stadium. The games are part of the inaugural Guinness International Champions Cup, an eight-team tournament overall that mostly will be played in the United States. In the first round Aug. 1, the Galaxy will play Real Madrid in Phoenix and Juventus will play Everton in San Francisco. The winners of those two games then meet in the second round at Dodger Stadium. On the same day, the first-round losers also will play each other at Chavez Ravine. All eight teams then move to the final rounds at Sun Life Stadium in Miami on Aug. 6-7 to determine the champion and runner-up finishes. "We're very excited about this," Dodgers President Stan Kasten told a news conference held in centerfield at Dodger Stadium. "When we heard [the tournament] was a possibility we got very interested right away," Kasten said, adding that seeing the four teams on a single day in Southern California was "an extraordinary opportunity."
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Weekend in January might feature outdoor games at Dodger Stadium and Yankee Stadium
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Somehow A's have found way to win in an outdated park and brutal market
-MLB rejects San Jose's mayor's request to discuss ballpark for A's

-Blue Jays Open to Playing a Home Game in Montreal

Busch Stadium Crowd Gets Big Kicks from Soccer
Forget baseball. For some, making fun of soccer is a national pastime. There’s this dis from Mike Ditka: “If God had wanted man to play soccer, he wouldn’t have given us arms.” And this slam from comedian Daniel Tosh: “It’s hard for me to get into a sport that I mastered at the age of 7.” But for 16-year-old fan Eddie Pinon, soccer is no joke. He traveled to Busch Stadium with his brother from North Carolina to watch Thursday’s exhibition match between English Premier League powerhouses Chelsea and Manchester City. “People call soccer boring,” Pinon said. “What are they talking about? In football, plays last only a few seconds. And baseball is slow. But soccer is nonstop action. And you’ve got two of the three best English Premier League teams right here. How can that not be exciting?” The globe’s most popular sport was a hot ticket in St. Louis on Thursday. Fans embraced not only the game, but the culture, wearing expensive jerseys and wrapping blue Chelsea flags around their shoulders.
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Weekend in January might feature outdoor games at Dodger Stadium and Yankee Stadium
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Somehow A's have found way to win in an outdated park and brutal market
-MLB rejects San Jose's mayor's request to discuss ballpark for A's

-Blue Jays Open to Playing a Home Game in Montreal

It's Official: Dodger Stadium to host NHL Game
Better get the industrial-strength icemakers powered up. Dodger Stadium, which has hosted 20 World Series games, a Mass conducted by Pope John Paul II and concerts by The Beatles and Michael Jackson, is going to open its doors to an unlikely event – a hockey game. The NHL will take its Stadium Series to California next season when the 2012 Stanley Cup champion Los Angeles Kings and the Anaheim Ducks play a regular-season game Jan. 25 at Dodger Stadium. It will be the league's first outdoor game west of the Mississippi. Considering the average temperature in Los Angeles in January fluctuates between a high of 68 and a low of 48, Dodger Stadium would hardly qualify as a site for the NHL's Winter Classic. So instead, the iconic venue will be employed in the league's new Stadium Series, a handful of games played in 2014 at outdoor locations, including the Pittsburgh Penguins visiting the Chicago Blackhawks at Soldier Field on March 1.
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Weekend in January might feature outdoor games at Dodger Stadium and Yankee Stadium
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Somehow A's have found way to win in an outdated park and brutal market
-MLB rejects San Jose's mayor's request to discuss ballpark for A's

-Blue Jays Open to Playing a Home Game in Montreal

Cubs Chairman Threatens to Move from Wrigley Field
Speaking at an event at the City Club of Chicago that included members of a rooftop residences' group, Ricketts told the assembled media and public that if the Cubs "cannot get approval for this plan and our signage plans are blocked we will then consider moving out of Wrigley Field." Chicago Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts threatened to move the club out of Wrigley Field if the team's plans for a larger scoreboard and additional signage are not approved. The Cubs are seeking approval for a 6,000-square foot video board atop the left-field wall and four new signs ringing the outfield. Ricketts called the Cubs' current video board "mid-size" and cited the potential for tens of millions of dollars in annual revenue. Speaking at the event, Cubs president of business operations Crane Kenney said the changes would be necessary for the Cubs - long one of baseball's leaders in revenue - to remain competitive. "We have to generate new revenue," he said. "We have to catch up to our large-market competitors on ballpark revenues, so this project has to work from a financial perspective as well."
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Weekend in January might feature outdoor games at Dodger Stadium and Yankee Stadium
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Somehow A's have found way to win in an outdated park and brutal market
-MLB rejects San Jose's mayor's request to discuss ballpark for A's

-Blue Jays Open to Playing a Home Game in Montreal

Yankee Stadium Set to Host Two Winter Classics
The Winter Classic will be expanded to six games next season, including two at Yankee Stadium involving all three metropolitan-area teams, according to a person briefed on matter but not authorized to speak publicly. The Canadian network TSN reported that the Rangers are tentatively scheduled to play the Devils at the Stadium on Jan. 26, followed by a Rangers-Islanders game Jan.29 — both games preceding the Super Bowl at MetLife Stadium on Feb. 2. The first game of the Classic will be held New Year’s Day between the Detroit Red Wings and the Toronto Maple Leafs at Michigan Stadium, before an expected crowd of more than 100,000. According to TSN, the Anaheim Ducks and the Los Angeles Kings are tentatively set to meet Jan. 25 at Dodger Stadium. The series would conclude with a Pittsburgh-Chicago game set for Soldier Field on March 1, and an Ottawa-Vancouver game set for B.C. Place on March 2. 
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Weekend in January might feature outdoor games at Dodger Stadium and Yankee Stadium
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Somehow A's have found way to win in an outdated park and brutal market
-MLB rejects San Jose's mayor's request to discuss ballpark for A's

-College Football Game set for Busch Stadium

Red Sox Sellout Streak Comes to an End at Fenway Park
The sellout streak at Fenway Park, which began on May 15, 2003, and lasted 794 regular season games (820 if you include the postseason) came to an end with 30,862 turning up to watch the Red Sox's 8-5 loss to the Orioles on a rainy Wednesday night. "I think the word that comes to mind is grateful," said Red Sox chief operating officer Sam Kennedy. "Those of us that have been in baseball a long time know you don't get this in most markets. To have the type of fan support we've had this decade is remarkable. "Walking out of the park with Mike Aviles after a game last year, Will Middlebrooks, a rookie still getting accustomed to the passion associated with the Fenway Park fans, received an odd request. "A woman asked me to sign her child," Middlebrooks recalled. "I was like, 'I'm not signing your child.' The kid was like 2 years old. I was like, 'I really don't feel comfortable signing your child.'" Middlebrooks said he's been in awe at the passion and support from fans in Boston, but odd stories like his are a product of packing 33,000-plus people into Fenway Park for every home game over the last nine-plus years.
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Weekend in January might feature outdoor games at Dodger Stadium and Yankee Stadium
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Somehow A's have found way to win in an outdated park and brutal market
-MLB rejects San Jose's mayor's request to discuss ballpark for A's

Cubs, City Complete Deal for Wrigley Field Renovations
TCubs chairman Tom Ricketts unveiled a $500 million plan for the renovation of Wrigley Field, which includes a video scoreboard in left field as well as significant improvements to the Wrigleyville community. The Cubs and the city of Chicago reached an agreement on the proposal, which has been reviewed in community meetings over the past few weeks and will continue to be discussed. The Cubs must formally submit plan development designs to the city for more public hearings before it is finalized, and that could be completed within the next few weeks. "If this plan is approved, we will win the World Series for our fans and our city," Ricketts said. Ricketts called Monday a "milestone" for the Cubs. The team first revealed its five-year renovation plan at the Cubs Convention in January. No public dollars will be needed to save the 99-year-old ballpark.

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Weekend in January might feature outdoor games at Dodger Stadium and Yankee Stadium
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Somehow A's have found way to win in an outdated park and brutal market
-Charles Ebbets, Brooklyn's Team and Their Ballpark

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Ricketts puts people above family business in Wrigley Field deal
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Tunney suggests parking garage part of Wrigley Field mix
-Charles Ebbets, Brooklyn's Team and Their Ballpark
-Tiger Stadium site's future remains unclear as Detroit Tigers fans embrace Opening Day

Echoes of Ebbets Field as It Turns 100
The apartment complex has stood longer than its fabled ancestor. On the wall near the Bedford Avenue entrance to the 1,318 units that rise 20 beige-brick stories is a concrete marker dated 1962 that reads, “This Is the Former Site of Ebbets Field. People have lived there for more than half a century, longer than the 44 years the Brooklyn Dodgers played there before Walter O’Malley, their restless owner, rode a one-way ticket to Los Angeles after the 1957 season. And some of the apartment dwellers know about those Dodgers. “I do,” a tenant in his late 20s said the other day. “I played baseball as a kid.” But in the office where everybody pays the rent, another young man didn’t know much about the Dodgers, and he didn’t seem to care. Those dear departed Brooklyn Dodgers are apparently not of his world, not worth a ceremony at the apartment complex commemorating the opening 100 years ago of Ebbets Field.
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Rangers Ballpark upgrades include wider main concourse, extra row of seats
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Baseball in Alamodome is a home run with fans
-Busch Stadium to Host Soccer Match
-America's Most Expensive Baseball Stadium Neighborhoods
-Safeco Field Changes aren't expected to turn ballpark in Launching Pad

'New' old Dodger Stadium: $100 Million Fan Experience
The Dodgers' roster received some notable upgrades this off season, thanks to the infusion of payroll by the Guggenheim ownership group. Fittingly, the facelift that a fleet of fork-lift trucks and other earth-moving machines were able to pull off on Dodger Stadium over the winter is as equally if not more impressive, considering the time restraints that restrict such restructuring on a place that's held its beauty for more than 50 years. What's old looks new, and what's new looks 1960s era retro. Welcome back to the future. Those fans fortunate enough to have an Opening Day ticket to take in Monday's Dodgers-Giants game at Chavez Ravine, one that's expected to draw a capacity of 56,000 for the usual array of bunting, balloons and beach balls, will experience an even more polished product than was on display Friday when the first and only exhibition game was played there so far this season.
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Rangers Ballpark upgrades include wider main concourse, extra row of seats
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Baseball in Alamodome is a home run with fans
-Busch Stadium to Host Soccer Match
-America's Most Expensive Baseball Stadium Neighborhoods
-Safeco Field Changes aren't expected to turn ballpark in Launching Pad

Candlestick Park to Get Blown Up After Next NFL Season
The most fervent desires of plenty of bundled-up, shivering fans in San Francisco are finally coming true: Candlestick Park will get blown up. The much-maligned, long-outdated home of the San Francisco 49ers and formerly the Giants, infamous for the sight of hot-dog wrappers swirling on the field while players and fans braved the frigid night wind, will meet its demise soon after the end of the next NFL season, the San Francisco Chronicle reports. The 49ers are moving to a new stadium in Santa Clara, some 40 miles south, for the beginning of the 2014 season, leaving The Stick without a tenant. The plans call for the ballpark to be demolished in a 30-second implosion and for the site to be used for a mall and residential/office complex.
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All-Star Game Slated for Great American Ball Park in 2015
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Task force says new Rays stadium is affordable — with taxes
 -Mets Lose Spring Training Stadium Sponsor

Rays: MLB Doesn't Believe in Tampa Bay Anymore
The Rays like Tampa Bay. Major League Baseball doesn't. That's the message Tampa Bay Rays principal owner Stuart Sternberg related Thursday in his most forceful public commentary to date on the long-term outlook for the team, whose attendance has not matched its recent performance on the field. "Major League Baseball doesn't believe anymore in the Tampa Bay area," Sternberg told Hillsborough County commissioners in a lively morning session that ran twice as long as its scheduled 30 minutes. Sternberg spoke to Hillsborough commissioners at their invitation. Some commissioners have made little secret they would like the Rays to move to Hillsborough County. The team has a contract to play at St. Petersburg's Tropicana Field through 2027, and St. Petersburg Mayor Bill Foster has threatened to sue any entities that try to lure the Rays away from the city.
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All-Star Game Slated for Great American Ball Park in 2015
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Task force says new Rays stadium is affordable — with taxes
 -Mets Lose Spring Training Stadium Sponsor

Cincinnati to Host 2015 All-Star Game
Major League Baseball’s All-Star Game will return to Cincinnati in 2015. Commissioner Bud Selig made the announcement this afternoon and also said that the newest Major League Baseball Urban Youth Academy will be built in Cincinnati for 2015. “The history of MLB cannot be told without the story of Cincinnati,” Selig said. Selig said Cincinnati fans won’t recognize the All-Star Game since it was last in the Queen City in 1988. “The scale of the All-Star game now is stunning,” Selig said. ” … It’s a six-day event. This will start on Thursday. … it will be a great economic benefit to Cincinnati from $80 to 100 million.” Reds owner Bob Castellini said Baseball could not have selected a more grateful or worthy community. “The 2015 season is destined to be one of our greatest,” Castellini said. ” … the honor has been earned by you, our fans.”
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All-Star Game Slated for Great American Ball Park in 2015
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Task force says new Rays stadium is affordable — with taxes
 -Mets Lose Spring Training Stadium Sponsor

Cubs Unveil $300 Million Wrigley Field Renovation Plan
Cubs Chairman Tom Ricketts said Saturday the team will fund an ambitious $300 million renovation plan at Wrigley Field if the city eases some of its restrictions around Wrigley Field. “The fact is that when you look at all of the limitations that we have, whether that’s signage in the outfield, which we are not allowed to do, or what kind of stuff we do in the park or around the park, I think we’d just like a little more flexibility to have some options on that stuff,” Ricketts said after a question-and-answer session with fans at the Cubs Convention. “We have an opportunity cost there that’s tremendous. Just give us some relief on some of these restrictions, and we’ll take care of (renovating) Wrigley Field.”
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All-Star Game Slated for Great American Ball Park in 2015
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Task force says new Rays stadium is affordable — with taxes
 -Mets Lose Spring Training Stadium Sponsor

Vast Upgrades Being Made to Dodger Stadium
 New ownership promised fans an improved Dodger Stadium and on Tuesday held an event to prove it's coming. With heavy construction ongoing on all five levels and into the ground, officials confirmed details of upgrades to bring the 51-year-old landmark "into the 21st century" and improve the fan experience, according to club president Stan Kasten, who said the speculated $100 million price tag is "as good as any to use." Kasten said he's "sure we will be considered" to host the All-Star Game for the first time since 1980 because of the improvements, and he also gave assurances that the ambitious work will be completed in time for the March 28 exhibition game against the Angels. "We're doing about a hundred things and left out another 100 things because we only had 25 weeks to get it all done by Opening Day," Kasten said.
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Study reveals cost of Rays' stadium to be at least $500 million
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Task force says new Rays stadium is affordable — with taxes
 -Mets Lose Spring Training Stadium Sponsor

Mariners Adding Largest Video/Scoreboard in MLB
Unable to wait for the Thanksgiving sales, the Mariners went ahead and bought a huge new TV for Safeco Field. Huge is actually an understatement. Last week the team began work on what will be the biggest video display in Major League Baseball and one of the largest in professional sports. It's the centerpiece of the biggest upgrade to the ballpark since it opened in 1999 and a technical marvel that could become a tourist attraction on its own. At 201.5 feet by 56.7 feet, the display is nearly a block long and wider than the record-holding jumbo display at Dallas Cowboys Stadium. It's ten times the size of the ballpark's current video screen and has a viewing area of roughly 2,182 42-inch TVs. And yes, it will still display hydro races - but the boats will now be rendered in full 1080p high-resolution.
Harang likes new clubhouse plans for Dodger Stadium
Offseason to bring more changes to Rangers Ballpark in Arlington
Tiger Stadium lettering going on display at museum
Rangers to Play at San Antonio's Alamadome
Padres Moving Fences in at Petco Park for 2013

Wrigley Field Should Be On Deck for the Bears
Come November, Wrigleyville is usually pretty dead. It’s usually pretty dead in October too, mind you. But that’s for different reasons. However, the powers that be on the North Side of Chicago (aka Tom Ricketts & Theo Epstein) want to change that – and not just by putting a baseball team inside Wrigley Field that’s actually built for the fall. Earlier this month, the Cubs secured approval from the Chicago Landmarks Commission to move the brick wall behind Wrigley’s home plate this offseason and add 56 prime box seats. Just as significantly – if not more so – the team will also convert a section of the wall near the home dugout so a regulation football field can fit inside the ballpark. Two years ago, of course, Northwestern and Illinois clashed at Wrigley for the first football game at the ballpark in four decades, but were forced to play in just one direction because of space limitations and safety concerns.
Tigers fit well in NL ballparks
Offseason to bring more changes to Rangers Ballpark in Arlington
Tiger Stadium lettering going on display at museum
Detroit Historical Museum to display old Tiger Stadium sign
Padres Moving Fences in at Petco Park for 2013

Tiger Stadium Lives On, Nurtures Old Memories
The flags were snapping, straight out from home plate. With no structure to block the wind, the sunshine was deceptive. On the field at Tiger Stadium, it was cold. In a few hours, at Comerica Park, the Detroit Tigers were going to play baseball in front of tens of thousands of fans. At Michigan and Trumbull, Jerry Wright of Lincoln Park had the old ball field to himself. The people who love the stadium enough to tend the playing field have put up two makeshift dugout benches. Wright was sitting on the one along the third base line, drinking Busch from an oversized can. With baseball on so many minds, and with one of the ballpark gates swung open on the Michigan Avenue side, the field has been something of a destination over the past few weeks.

Rangers Given Tax Breaks On Stadium Renovations
Safeco Field upgrades will cost 'seven digits' or more
Nebraska and Northwestern could meet at Wrigley Field
Alderman seeking deal for signs atop rooftop clubs by Wrigley
Detroit Historical Museum to display old Tiger Stadium sign

Dodger Stadium Upgrades on tap this Offseason
The season is over for the Dodgers, but Dodger Stadium will be busy pretty much until opening day because of planned upgrades to the stadium this offseason. Dodgers CEO Stan Kasten said on Thursday that final plans and permits are getting approved this week for several upgrades to Dodger Stadium, which just completed its 51st season in use, the third oldest stadium in MLB. Kasten wouldn't divulge full details before the plans became official, though he did say the information would be available soon.
Twins to revamp bleachers, add drink rail seats
Marlins Park shines, but attendance disappoints
MLB attendance rises to highest level since '08
Marlins Park attendance suffers amid team's failure
Website Ranks Wrigley Field As MLB's Dirtiest Ballpark

Mariners to Move Safeco Fences in Next Season
Picture Courtesy: Mark WhittTired of seeing fly balls die in a cavernous outfield and free-agent sluggers choose more hitter-friendly settings, the Seattle Mariners are bringing in the fences at Safeco Field. The Mariners announced Tuesday they will move in the fences for the 2013 season after years of debate on the impact one of the more spacious outfields in baseball was having on their offense. "It's all about just the ballpark playing fair and I think they've done a great job with the changes they are planning on making. I just think it's a win-win situation," Seattle manager Eric Wedge said. "I think it's fantastic for our younger position players, it's a more attractive location now for players outside the organization who might consider coming this direction, so I think it's a good decision." The biggest change will come in the left-center field alley, where the fence will move in as much as 17 feet. The left-center power alley is currently 390 feet, but will be at 378 next season.
Twins to revamp bleachers, add drink rail seats
Marlins Park shines, but attendance disappoints
MLB attendance rises to highest level since '08
Marlins Park attendance suffers amid team's failure
Website Ranks Wrigley Field As MLB's Dirtiest Ballpark

Private Developer Reveals Rays Stadium Details
After two years of behind-the-scenes preparation, private developers unveiled plans Friday for a new baseball stadium — without any assurance that the Tampa Bay Rays are even interested or whether anyone will foot the bill. Still, CityScape's "Rays Park at Carillon" is a substantial proposal — created by prominent stadium builders, accompanied by adjacent development and backed by a fresh look at regional drive times. It represents the most detailed alternative to Tropicana Field since the team's own waterfront project fizzled in 2008. City Council members, who held a special two-hour meeting to receive the presentation, came away impressed, saying they hope the plan will end a standoff with the Rays over where a new stadium might be located.
Miami Marlins Drawing Fewest Fans At A First-Year Ballpark In Three Decades
New use for old Tiger Stadium site? Parade Company talking with city
Rangers Plan for $10 Million Ballpark Renovation

Rangers Plan for $10 Million Ballpark Renovation
New seating behind home plate and even more concessions are part of about $10 million in ballpark renovations the Rangers have proposed for the offseason, which the team hopes doesn't begin until November. The team, which has the best record in the American League, wants to add a row of seats by moving the wall behind home plate at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington forward and closer to the field, according to a city staff report given to the Arlington City Council. Upgraded and expanded concession facilities are also slated for the main concourse area near the home-plate entrance. Construction is set to begin shortly after the team's season ends. "We hope that's not until November.
Miami Marlins Drawing Fewest Fans At A First-Year Ballpark In Three Decades
New use for old Tiger Stadium site? Parade Company talking with city
Rangers Ballpark Filling Up Nightly
Arlington Stadium vs. Rangers Ballpark in Arlington

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