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BALLPARK NEWS ARCHIVE

Diamondbacks Want Out of Chase Field Lease
The Arizona Diamondbacks want out of their lease at taxpayer-owned Chase Field so they can negotiate with other entities for new stadium, according to documents obtained by 12 News. Maricopa County's rejection of the Diamondbacks' request has now led to an angry response from the team's chief executive officer, Derrick Hall, declaring that he was "shocked and disappointed" by the county's response. The team has threatened to sue if the county doesn't give it permission to look for other stadium sites.The back-and-forth began with Hall's two-paragraph letter March 16 to the Maricopa County Board, asking to modify the Chase Field lease.

Busch Stadium to Host NHL Hockey Game in 2017
Outdoor hockey is coming to St. Louis. The NHL said Wednesday night before the St. Louis Blues' game against the Chicago Blackhawks that the teams will play in the Winter Classic at Busch Stadium on Monday, Jan. 2. St. Louis will be the eighth franchise to host the Winter Classic. The game is usually held on Jan. 1, but the league is pushing it back a day as it did in 2012 to avoid going head-to-head with the NFL. It will be the first outdoor game in Blues history. The Blackhawks will be playing in their third Winter Classic and fifth outdoor game. Also Wednesday, the NHL said Toronto will host Detroit in the Centennial Classic on Jan. 1 at BMO Field to celebrate the league's 100th anniversary, and Pittsburgh will host Philadelphia on Feb. 18 at Heinz Field in the Coors Light NHL Stadium Series.
-Driving to Dodger Stadium? Take the new Vin Scully Avenue
-2016 Stadium Series: Coors Field Preps For Avalanche And Red Wings

Fenway Park Transform into Winter Sports Park
Fenway Park has been the home of the Boston Red Sox since 1912. While baseball is the main focus of the stadium, it has hosted other events such as concerts, football, soccer and even hockey. Now the 104-year-old stadium can add a couple other winter sports to its resume: skiing and snowboarding. Standing high above the Green Monster, a 140-foot ski jump has been constructed in centerfield, sloping down to home plate, for the Big Air at Fenway U.S. Grand Prix event to be held this Thursday and Friday. Some of the best free skiers and snowboarders from around the world will gather inside the historic baseball stadium to compete in front of a large crowd of more than 20,000. "When people see it in person in Boston, they're going to be like, 'This is crazy,'" snowboarder Eric Beauchemin told the Boston Globe.
-Driving to Dodger Stadium? Take the new Vin Scully Avenue
-Rays allowed to expand new ballpark search to Hillsborough

Rangers to Add New Videoboard to Globe Life Park
The Texas Rangers will have rookie foul poles and a new video display board in left field at Globe Life Park this season. The club said it will replace the foul poles that have been in service to the club since 1972. The poles came with the club when it moved from Arlington Stadium to its current digs before the 1994 season.
The new poles, made of structural pipe, remain at a height of 92 feet but will be nearly double in width, increasing their strength.
For those devoted to the old poles, one-foot sections will be on sale for $100 during the club's Fan Fest at the park on Jan. 23. Proceeds will go to the club's charitable arm, the Texas Rangers Baseball Foundation.

-As Raiders dominate headlines, Oakland scouts for new A’s home
-Rays allowed to expand new ballpark search to Hillsborough

Blue Jays to Install Dirt infield at Rogers Centre for 2016
The Toronto Blue Jays are aiming to install a dirt infield at the Rogers Centre in time for the start of the 2016 season next April. A source familiar with the plan said work is tentatively scheduled to begin in February, a month when no events are scheduled at the Rogers Centre. Stephen Brooks, the club’s vice-president of business operations, mentioned the planned February start in reply to a Twitter question from a fan on Saturday night. Throughout their history, the Jays have played their home games on artificial turf, with dirt cutouts around the bases and pitcher’s mound. Mark Shapiro, the club’s new president and CEO, told reporters Thursday that a dirt infield is “possible” for 2016 but did not elaborate.
-Arlington council OKs teaming with Rangers on development next to ballpark
-Turner Field to be sold to Georgia State and developer Carter

Padres Announce Petco Park Upgrades for 2016
The San Diego Padres today announced details surrounding upgrades at Petco Park for 2016. The centerpiece of the updates is a new two-level social space in right-center field inspired by San Diego's beach lifestyle. Locally based Sun Diego Boardshops has expanded its existing relationship with the Padres to become the presenting partner of the space, which will be constructed in the location currently occupied by The Beachers seating area and The Beach play area. As part of the design, the children's sand play area will be preserved and relocated to a space along K Street, further removed from the playing field and safe from balls in play. Construction is set to begin this week. "Sun Diego epitomizes what is unique and desirable about all of Southern California, and we are excited to expand our partnership with such an iconic local company that is emblematic of that lifestyle," said Padres President & CEO Mike Dee.
-Coca-Cola boots Pepsi from Mets’ home ballpark
-Cleveland Indians getting new scoreboard at Progressive Field

SunTrust Park Construction on Schedule
The ballpark is starting to look like a ballpark. And now work has begun in earnest on The Battery, the $450 million mixed-use development the Atlanta Braves are building next to SunTrust Park.
Two years to the day after the Braves announced their plan to build a new baseball stadium in Cobb County, nearly all of the concrete and steel work has been completed; risers in the lower seating bowl are clearly visible; and brick that will be the stadium’s outer “skin” is being attached to walls beyond the outfield. Construction crews have been working on the plaza area that will transition between the ballpark and the mixed-use development — most of which is expected to be open when the team throws its first pitch in April 2017.

-Wrigley Field Marquee Removed for Renovation Work
-Foul poles coming down at Busch

Twins Announce Target Field Remodeling Project
The Minnesota Twins 2016 season is still months away, but the ballclub is already making moves to improve the fan experience at Target Field. The Twins unveiled plans to reconfigure Target Field's centerfield seating area into what they call "multi-level fan gathering spaces." The project will be the most extensive renovations at Target Field since the stadium opened, and is designed to give new life to a previously underutilized portion of the ballpark. "The Twins are committed to continually improving Target Field with a focus on delivering the best fan experience in professional sports," said Twins President Dave St. Peter. "We're excited to unveil these unique spaces to our fans with a belief that they make the ballpark better."
-Petco Park to transform into a golf course
-Council Approves Plan to let Rays look for New Ballpark

Council Approves Plan to let Rays look for New Ballpark
The St. Petersburg City Council has approved a proposal that would allow the Tampa Bay Rays to look at new ballpark locations, but the city's mayor doesn't think the team will agree. The board voted 5-3 Thursday for a plan that would charge the Rays up to $4 million a year to leave Tropicana Field before their lease ends in 2027, as well as $5 million in additional fees. That means the Rays would pay up to $33 million if they moved in 2020. The amount would depend on whether the team stayed in St. Petersburg, moved to another part of Pinellas County or moved across the bay to neighboring Hillsborough County.
-Petco Park to transform into a golf course
-Royals get crafty, develop new bar at Kauffman Stadium

Tal's Hill to Remain at Minute Maid Park for 2016 Season
It looks like Tal's Hill isn't going anywhere after all. At least not for the 2016 season. This past summer, the team announced plans to remove the iconic feature of Minute Maid Park, but now the team has decided to suspend renovations in center field. "Through the bidding process, we determined that the construction timelines to have the ballpark ready for Opening Day 2016 became too risky, and we decided it was in everyone's best interest to postpone the renovation." said Astros President of Business Operations Reid Ryan. "The playing field, including Tal's Hill, will stay the same for the 2016 season. Other potential renovations to the ballpark are being evaluated, and we will announce future plans in the coming months."
-Petco Park to transform into a golf course
-Royals get crafty, develop new bar at Kauffman Stadium

Orioles Plan Major Upgrades for Camden Yards
The Baltimore Orioles are considering updates to Oriole Park at Camden Yards, the 23-year-old stadium still celebrated for its red-brick hominess and retro charm. Representatives of the team and its state landlord say they foresee a balancing act as they ponder possible renovations. Their goal is to ensure the ballpark maximizes revenues for the club and possesses state-of-the-art amenities without sacrificing the ambience of a venue many fans say feels like home. The stadium, with the brick B&O Warehouse as the right field backdrop, is rated among the best in Major League Baseball in fan and media surveys. But most of the 29 other teams have opened new ballparks since Camden Yards' 1992 debut, when it was the forerunner of a new generation of baseball-only stadiums in downtown areas.
-Braves Give Official Exit Date for Turner Field
-Royals get crafty, develop new bar at Kauffman Stadium

Indians Announce Phase II of Renovations at Ballpark
A new club behind home plate on Progressive Field's main level highlights the second phase of renovations to the ballpark, the Indians announced Wednesday. The Indians also announced an expansion of concessions for the entire ballpark similar to what was done in the right field stands this year, which included offerings from Melt, Barrio, Sweet Moses, Great Lakes Brewing Co. and Dynomite Burgers. The new club behind home plate will include a full bar, concessions, a customer-service center and a glass front so fans can watch the game. The club will stay open after games and provide season ticket holders a place to go while traffic clears.
-Braves Give Official Exit Date for Turner Field
-Royals get crafty, develop new bar at Kauffman Stadium

Up-and-Down Season at Yankee Stadium, for Flag Crew
Early in the afternoon on many spring, summer and fall days, two men — sometimes three — hike to the top row of the upper deck at Yankee Stadium, where the oxygen begins to thin. They climb a 20-foot ladder and squeeze through a portal in the roof that is no bigger than Brett Gardner’s strike zone. Once they have pulled themselves through and regained their equilibrium, if not a settled stomach, they clip safety harnesses to a rail and go about their work. “We always talk about bringing beach chairs up here and saying, ‘Let them come find us,’ ” Clinton Thomas, the leader of the crew, said with a laugh.
-2nd video board set to enhance Great American Ball Park

Astros Announce Renovations for Minute Maid Park
Team officials said the design of the new center field area was in partnership with MSA Sport and influenced by feedback from fans, current and former players and front office personnel. Astros executives said they also visited over 20 MLB parks in the Center Field Project planning process. "We are extremely excited about our plans for center field, and are confident that our fans will be as well," said Astros President of Business Operations Reid Ryan. "Our goal will be to create a unique and entertaining atmosphere for our fans that will include great happy hour spots and spectacular views. It will also be visual, giving the ballpark an exciting, new look."
-2nd video board set to enhance Great American Ball Park
-Royals get crafty, develop new bar at Kauffman Stadium

Braves Begin Selling Tickets to SunTrust Park
The Atlanta Braves started to sell season tickets to the future SunTrust Park and released a new virtual park fly-through and new stadium renderings. A SunTrust Park Preview Center now overlooks SunTrust Park and the adjacent mixed-use community construction site. It gives A List Members -- current season ticket holders -- an immersive experience through a blend of advanced technology and actual ballpark amenities. Outfitted with meeting rooms named after Braves legends, A List Members and other visitors will experience flythrough videos of the mixed-use community, the exterior of SunTrust Park as well as key amenity areas within the ballpark.
-2nd video board set to enhance Great American Ball Park
-Royals get crafty, develop new bar at Kauffman Stadium

Wrigley Videoboard Balances Digital Present, Ballpark Past
Ever since the Cubs announced plans to erect a giant video board at the back of the left-field bleachers, baseball traditionalists fretted that this insertion of flashy technology would disrupt one of the most beloved places in Chicago and the nation — the baseball paradise of Wrigley Field. But the new board, which made its debut in Sunday night's opening game against the St. Louis Cardinals, brings a magnified version of flat-screen TV viewing to the Edenic ballpark without the feared disruptive jolt. There are no silly sponsor races between innings. Ads are tastefully displayed on the board. Fans can easily glimpse replays, player statistics, pitch speeds and close-ups of players without having to consult their smartphones.
-Tampa Bay fans, take note: Passion for baseball is greater in Montreal
-Will preseason buzz cure Cleveland Indians attendance blues?
-Royals get crafty, develop new bar at Kauffman Stadium

Indians Battle Rough Winter to Complete Renovations
The only objects being thrown inside Progressive Field right now are snowballs. But although most of the ballpark's infield remains buried from an unrelenting winter, the Indians are confident renovations at Progressive Field will be completed in time for the April 10 home opener. "We'll be in good shape if the weather holds like this over the next couple weeks," Jeff Wilen, the club's director of strategy and business analytics said as he looked up at a cloudless sky on a 45-degree afternoon. Fingers crossed. The Indians' home ballpark, built in 1994, has been remodeled this offseason with new tiered bullpens, open terraces, an expanded kids clubhouse and a two-story bar in the right-field corner that will likely be packed with frozen fans during chilly April and May home games.
-Detroit’s Tiger Stadium Redevelopment Project Turns to ‘Crowdfunding’
-Montreal threat a reminder of how MLB once touted Tampa
All-Star Game Coming to Marlins Park in 2017
The 2017 All-Star Game will be played at Marlins Park. Officials are expected to announce within the week that Miami has been awarded the Midsummer Classic for the first time, multiple sources with knowledge of the agreement confirmed Tuesday to the Miami Herald. Marlins and Major League Baseball officials refused to comment. The awarding of the 2017 event will mark the end of a long and bumpy road to bring the All-Star Game to South Florida. The Marlins tried — and failed — in their bid to host the 2015 All-Star Game at their new, retractable roof ballpark, which opened in 2012.
-Detroit’s Tiger Stadium Redevelopment Project Turns to ‘Crowdfunding’
-Montreal threat a reminder of how MLB once touted Tampa

Demolition Begins at Candlestick Park
Candlestick Park was the perpetual butt of gibes about its temperature, winds, discomfort and inaccessibility — and it sat there for six decades on the edge of San Francisco Bay and took it. But it cannot withstand one final assault, by giant mechanical dinosaurs that eat up the plastic seats and the metal grandstands. In a few days, bigger mechanical dinosaurs will arrive to begin eating up the concrete superstructure itself.
The wrecking machines lurch from one sacred spot to another, pulling the stadium apart. They stagger over the field where Willie Mays caught baseballs over his shoulder. They pile old seats on the turf where Dwight Clark caught footballs over his shoulder.

-Marlins in running for hosting 2017 All-Star Game
-Montreal threat a reminder of how MLB once touted Tampa

New Ballpark for Jays Would be Tough Sell
The night SkyDome opened was a real humdinger. Our front page guy nearly had a stroke. The world kept throwing him loops, on a night when the opening of Toronto’s big, concrete cathedral of sport should have been a slam-dunk for top billing. In Iran, the Ayatollah Khomeini inconveniently died. In Beijing, Chinese soldiers slaughtered student protesters in Tiananmen Square. Reba McEntire even got married. All on June 3, 1989. SkyDome’s opening ceremony was its own melodrama. I was up in the press box with Christie Blatchford as all hell broke out below. I remember turning to Blatch and hollering, “Oh, the humanity!” It got real grisly.
-Marlins in running for hosting 2017 All-Star Game
-Montreal threat a reminder of how MLB once touted Tampa

Wrigley Field Bleachers Won't Open Until at least May 11
Visiting hitters won't have their home runs thrown back onto Wrigley Field until May 11, at least, as the Cubs announced the stadium's famous bleachers won't be open for the first month of the 2015 season. The target date is May 11 for the left field bleachers and late May for the right field bleachers, Cubs president of business operations Crane Kenney said at the team's convention Saturday. The bleacher reconstruction is part of the first phase of a $375 million renovation of the famous stadium, which celebrated its 100th birthday last season. Wrigley Field currently is a construction zone, and those who walk by can see the progress of the bleacher areas. In late November, Kenney broke the news to a group of Cubs bloggers that the bleachers wouldn't be ready for opening night, a Sunday night game on April 5 against the St. Louis Cardinals. "We're going to do it right," Kenney said. "If we miss the month of April, we do."
-Mets Making Big Changes To Scoreboard At Citi Field
-San Diego's Petco Park to Host 2016 All-Star Game

San Diego's Petco Park to Host 2016 All-Star Game
The 2016 All-Star Game -- and, of course, all the events that go along with it -- will be held in San Diego, Major League Baseball announced Thursday. “I am very pleased to award the 2016 All-Star Game to the San Diego Padres, who made a detailed and comprehensive bid in conjunction with city officials," outgoing commissioner Bud Selig said. "San Diego is one of America's most beautiful cities, and showcasing Petco Park in its thriving downtown will be a remarkable opportunity for the Padres franchise and all of Major League Baseball.”
-Development Plan Selected for Tiger Stadium Site
-Twins will add bar, remove retail in $2.5 million changes to Target Field
-Rays Reach Agreement to Allow Stadium Search

Fan's Interests at Heart of Minute Maid Park Renovations
Minute Maid Park figures to look drastically different over the next couple of years, as the Astros continue to make changes to improve the fan experience throughout the ballpark. Major renovations began at the end of the season, when the team began reshaping the club level and upper-deck areas to improve concessions and make them more open. The club level is receiving a floor-to-ceiling makeover that will include a pair of bar areas with views of the field and improved concessions. Bigger changes lie ahead following the 2015 season, when the Astros renovate the areas behind the center-field wall, including the possible removal of Tal's Hill and repositioning of the bullpens. There could even be a Hall of Fame area and a plaza outside the ballpark.
-Development Plan Selected for Tiger Stadium Site
-Twins will add bar, remove retail in $2.5 million changes to Target Field
-Rays Reach Agreement to Allow Stadium Search

Nationals Park Getting Winter Classic Makeover
Washington Capitals fans are counting down the days — not to Christmas, but to New Year’s Day, when the Caps face off against the Chicago Blackhawks atop the diamond in Nationals Park. While 30-degree temperatures and overcast skies may not sound perfect to most, that’s exactly what National Hockey League organizers are hoping for when the puck drops at the Winter Classic. “People don’t realize sun is a factor with the logos in the ice. The sun is just as bad as rain at some point,” says Don Renzulli, the vice president of events for the NHL. Although the league has put on 12 outdoor events since 2008, the weather always presents challenges, especially when it comes to maintaining the ice. “If we get sunny days, we’ll cover it. We’ve got thermal blankets we’ll put over the ice and as soon as we get shadows over the ice we’ll get back to work,” he says.
-Development Plan Selected for Tiger Stadium Site
-Twins will add bar, remove retail in $2.5 million changes to Target Field
-Rays Reach Agreement to Allow Stadium Search

Great American Ball Park Needs New Seats
A little more than a decade after Great American Ball Park opened, the stadium's seats are falling apart and must be replaced. The cost to taxpayers, who are on the hook for the repairs, will be about $1.3 million. That's the bad news. The good news is that Hamilton County's solution to the problem is a case study in how necessity – and a really tight budget – can be the mother of invention. Faced with costs as high as $5 million, desperate county officials ended up turning the job of replacing 39,000 seats into a massive do-it-yourself project. They hired a local firm to design new molds for the seats, found a plastics company to make the seat backs and bottoms, and are paying former jail inmates and others about $10 an hour to install them. About 17,000 of the new seats already are in place, and county officials say they're stronger, better looking, more durable and less expensive than the originals.
-Wrigley Field Bleachers May Not be Ready for Opening Day
-Twins will add bar, remove retail in $2.5 million changes to Target Field
-Rays Reach Aggreement to Allow Stadium Search

Candlestick Park Seats Torn Out, Piled Up Over Stadium
Last year, the 49ers began selling pairs of Candlestick Park seats, giving first priority to season ticket holders.
Judging by the pictures captured by NBC Bay Area's helicopter, the supply has outweighed demand. Hundreds of discarded seats could be seen piled all over the place inside the now-defunct stadium. Also on Monday, San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee revealed the future of Candlestick, the site of which is slated to become an "urban outlet" mall, featuring an African diaspora-themed market, movie theaters and 6,000 homes. Proceeds from the chair that were sold were to benefit San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department youth programs.
-Braves Stadium Work Going Along to Game Plan
-New Citi Field Dimensions Give Mets One Less Excuse

Petco Poised to Begin Renovation Plan at Petco Park
Starting next week, you'll need a different kind of helmet if you're wandering the field at Petco Park -- a construction helmet. Wrecking ball, meet left-field bleachers. The Padres are embarking on a left-field renovation plan that will include the addition of the third-largest video board in baseball, improvements to the seating bowl, the addition of congregated areas with bar-stool seating and a small modification to the fences. The "eight-figure" investment, according to team president and CEO Mike Dee, will essentially be the second step in the team's entertainment overhaul, which started a year ago. Many of those changes were subtle to the eye (and ear).
-Braves Stadium Work Going Along to Game Plan
-Astros Mulling Minute Maid Park Renovations

A Giants Move Nearly Brought Baseball to Washington
As the World Series moves now to San Francisco, the fall classic will be well served by one of the crown jewel ballparks in baseball, with a passionate Giants fan base that fills AT&T Park on a regular basis, drawing 3.7 million this season, fourth-best in all of baseball. That’s a drastically different atmosphere from much of the time the Giants have spent in San Francisco, when they were on the verge of being moved out of town a number of times — including moving to Washington, D.C. The Giants’ attendance and financial woes before moving into their new ballpark in 2000 and saying goodbye to the cursed Candlestick Park nearly had a major impact on baseball in Washington, in several different instances.
-A's and San Jose agree on seven-year deal -- new ballpark hopes not dead yet
-Giants' old home, Seals Stadium, now largely forgotten

Cubs Finally Break Ground on Wrigley Field Renovation
Cubs chairman Tom Ricketts could hardly stop smiling. At the official breaking of ground in the long-awaited renovation of Wrigley Field, Ricketts delivered a speech, shoveled some ceremonial dirt and shook plenty of hands. It was a day he has been waiting for and one he truly relished after a long and sometimes contentious process of political wrangling that threatened to derail the makeover of the 100-year-old ballpark. “Were there ever any doubts? Yeah, absolutely. Are you kidding me?” Ricketts said. “The fact is that there were a lot of days where I was concerned that we would never get to here, absolutely.
-Dodger Stadium in play for temporary NFL L.A. location
-Would a New Stadium End the Tampa Bay Rays' Financial Problems?

Indians Progressive Field Renovations Underway
Renovations to Progressive Field have begun in earnest with the removal of seats in right field and the Indians announcing a plan for the relocation of the commemorative bricks. Those bricks, which were put in as the ballpark was being constructed in 1994, will be moved from Gate C plaza area near the Bob Feller statue to Gateway Plaza outside Gate A. The Feller and Jim Thome statues will be moved together in the new Gate C area and will be joined next year by a statue of Larry Doby. The Indians announced the renovation plans on Aug. 7 and is being privately funded by the team and Delaware North.
-Dodger Stadium in play for temporary NFL L.A. location
-Would a New Stadium End the Tampa Bay Rays' Financial Problems?

Angels Back Out of Lease Talks with Anaheim
After more than a year of contentious bargaining, the Angels on Friday terminated negotiations with the city of Anaheim over a new stadium lease. Angel officials said that they are now “exploring all options.” In the meantime, the Tustin City Council will hold a special closed-door meeting Tuesday night to solely discuss whether the team should move there. Angels spokeswoman Marie Garvey said that a deal has not been struck with Tustin, but noted that the team has become frustrated with the inability to reach an agreement with Anaheim. Tustin city officials could not immediately be reached for comment.
-Winners And Losers: MLB Attendance In 2014, Nearly 74 Million Through The Gate
-End of an Era: Wrigley Field Renovations Set to Start

Braves Name Their New Stadium: SunTrust Park
The Atlanta Braves announced the name of their new Cobb County stadium: SunTrust Park. The team and the Atlanta-based bank said they have entered into a 25-year naming-rights deal. “This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to partner with a great organization that shares our values for winning and serving the community,” SunTrust Chairman and CEO William H. Rogers, Jr., said. “This partnership provides SunTrust increased visibility on a regional and national level through a truly unique mixed-use development that will attract fans and visitors throughout the year. Importantly, it will help us reach more people as we fulfill our bank’s purpose of lighting the way to financial well-being.”
-Plans for Candlestick Park's Demolition Underway
-Astros president continues ballpark tour

Indians to Remodel Progressive Field
The Cleveland Indians will eliminate roughly 7,000 seats from Progressive Field, as part of a multimillion-dollar renovation designed to boost attendance at games and create more spaces that appeal to young professionals and families. Between the end of this season and opening day in 2015, the Indians hope to reconfigure stretches of the venue from center field to right field. They'll cap off a section of the upper deck, which sits empty on all but the busiest days, with a platform that will conceal unused seats and create new game-viewing areas.
-Braves release new pictures of ballpark, mixed-use project
-"The Jake" at 20: Indians mark the transformative ballpark's anniversary

Target Field is Ready for its All-Star Close-Up
With the All-Star game coming to the Twin Cities, the Minnesota Twins see the mid-summer party as more than a way to distract from another disappointing season. In some ways, it's a referendum on the success of outdoor baseball in the chilly north country and the first chance 5-year-old Target Field has had to take center stage. The Twins' new urban jewel of a ballpark opened in 2010 but has hosted only one postseason series. So team officials are looking forward to putting the ballpark - and yes, the weather - on display. ''One of the greatest things about All-Star week is it's going to be a showcase for the nation that this isn't necessarily the ice box 12 months of the year that people think it is,'' Twins President Dave St. Peter said.
-Raiders in Talks to Tear Down Coliseum Despite A's Deals
-Wrigley Field Renovation Unanimously Approved

Wrigley Field Renovation Unanimously Approved
The Chicago Cubs won unanimous approval from the Commission on Chicago Landmarks today for an ambitious $575 million remake of Wrigley Field. The new plan expands on last year’s proposal to renovate the 100-year-old stadium and surrounding areas and calls for seven advertising signs in the outfield, instead of two signs, including a Jumbotron-like video board in left field. After reducing the plan for the video board from 5,700 square feet to 4,452 square feet, Cubs officials recommended to the landmarks commission an even smaller size Thursday of 3,990 square feet.
-Raiders in Talks to Tear Down Coliseum Despite A's Deals
-Braves, Cobb detail stadium construction schedule

A's Sign Lease with O.co Coliseum for 10 years
The Oakland Athletics will be playing in O.co Coliseum for the next 10 years, the club announced in a press release Thursday. The talk of perhaps moving to San Jose or elsewhere is effectively put to bed and from the sounds of things, the A's won't be getting a new stadium in Oakland for at least 10 years."After much diligence and cooperation from both parties, we are delighted to make this announcement today," said A's Owner Lew Wolff in a statement. "We believe this agreement works well for city and county taxpayers, the team, A's fans and all involved. It provides stability for the A's while also improving fan and player experience with significant upgrades and improvements at the facility."
-Cubs plan more Wrigley signs amid fight with rooftop owners
-Braves, Cobb detail stadium construction schedule

Braves Release Renderings of New Ballpark
The Atlanta Braves released on Wednesday conceptual drawings of their planned 41,000-plus seat Cobb County Stadium. The images show a stadium with least four decks and a broad sun canopy with gathering places for fans. It also provides a glimpse at the design concepts behind the $400 million mixed-use complex to sit around the ballpark. “This is a very early look at how our vision is shaping up and, even though we are still months away from final plans and drawings, we are very pleased with the progress,” said Braves President John Schuerholz, said in a news release. “The renderings represent the sense of place we intend to create 365 days a year in addition to a world-class ballpark.”
-Emmett to host 'family chat' to discuss Astrodome
-Work on Historic League Park nears finish in Cleveland

-Braves, Cobb detail stadium construction schedule

GSU Wants to Turn Turner Field into Football Stadium
Georgia State is proposing repurposing Turner Field into a 30,000-seat football stadium and building another baseball stadium that will include Hank Aaron’s wall as part of the structure. University President Dr. Mark Becker and Atlanta real estate development firm Carter provided the Atlanta Journal-Constitution an exclusive look at the proposal on Wednesday. The idea is more than just stadiums. They want to be partners in building an estimated $300 million development that will include retail, residential and student housing and will be paid for through a mix of public and private funds.
-Emmett to host 'family chat' to discuss Astrodome
-Work on Historic League Park nears finish in Cleveland

-Braves, Cobb detail stadium construction schedule

Ivy, Brick Walls: Celebrating 100 Years of Wrigley Field
Wood can burn, but brick, concrete and steel beams do not. And in 1914, fire was a big deal, especially in Chicago. When Charles Weeghman, owner of the Chicago Federals, called architect Zachary Taylor Davis in 1914, flammability was foremost on his mind. Weeghman was looking for a new venue for his new team in its new league, and Davis was well known for designing Chicago’s other baseball stadium, Comiskey Park, which had been built without the extensive use of fire-happy wood. For Weegham, the goal was to create a stadium that would last, at least for longer than a few years. So the new baseball stadium at the corner of Addison and Sheffield streets in north Chicago served as the emergence of a baseball stadium design trend, at least in Chicago.
-New York MLS Team to Play at Yankee Stadium
-Work on Historic League Park nears finish in Cleveland

-Braves, Cobb detail stadium construction schedule

Marquee at Wrigley Field a Beloved Relic
It stands out on the corner of Clark and Addison, its bright red color and bold white letters welcoming you to the home of the Cubs. That home, Wrigley Field, is many things -- its iconic scoreboard, lush green ivy and 100 years of memories -- but the moment you know you've truly arrived at the Friendly Confines is the first glimpse of the marquee above the main entrance. The marquee hasn't been a part of Wrigley Field's entire 100-year history -- this season is only its 80th -- but it's as much a part of the ballpark's fabric as the sound of organ music and smell of Old Style. How a simple sign has become so beloved is through the passage of time, much in the same way Wrigley Field has endeared itself to baseball fans. "It feels authentic to people," said Stuart Shea, author of "Wrigley Field: The Long Life and Contentious Times of the Friendly Confines."
-Arlington and its ballpark mark a milestone with Rangers
-Mets' ballpark revenues drop for the fourth straight year

Owner says Changes at Coors Field "Pizazz it Up"
Dick Monfort passionately wants Coors Field to be the crown jewel of major-league ballparks. That was evident Wednesday afternoon as the Rockies owner conducted a media tour of The Rooftop, the stunning new party deck high above right field. "The sightlines are truly incredible, and I think the food and amenities are top of the line," said Monfort, unabashedly proud of the views, brews and food that come with the $10 million addition to the ballpark at 20th and Blake. "Our fans love the park, but we know that with all of the TV now, sometimes it's easier to just stay home and watch a game. But we want people to come to the ballpark. It's important for our competitive edge to have a lot of people here cheering."
-Arlington and its ballpark mark a milestone with Rangers
-Mets' ballpark revenues drop for the fourth straight year
-Over 50,000 turn out for MLB at Olympic Stadium Saturday

-Wrigley Field Turns 100, and Other Milestones Arriving in 2014
-Escaping Astrodoom? Why the derletict Astrodome sits in limbo

Baseball Returns to Montreal's Olmypic Stadium
If you mourned the demise of the Expos, the buzz of activity at Olympic Stadium on Wednesday would have warmed your heart — or tugged at your heart strings. Maybe both. Workers milled about the stadium, on the pitcher’s mound, at second base, and in one of the newly rebuilt players’ dugouts where fresh paint signs hung from the railings. The field is being converted from a soccer pitch to a baseball diamond for two hotly anticipated exhibition games this weekend between the Toronto Blue Jays and New York Mets. It’s the first time Major League Baseball has returned to Montreal since the league moved the troubled Expos franchise to Washington in 2005.
-Tigers add new security measures at ballpark
-Detroit Outlines New Vision For Old Tiger Stadium Site
-No Easy Task Preparing US Cellular Field for Opener

Wrigley Field Turns 100! See Historic Park, Then & Now!
Wrigley Field is about to turn a century old—the storied stadium will celebrate its 100th birthday on April 23. When it was built in 1914, the ballpark—then called Weeghman Park after the Chicago Federals owner Charles Weeghman—was one level and seated 14,000. At first, the stadium hosted the Federals, who later became known as the Chicago Whales. Then when the Federal League folded in 1915, a group of investors, including chewing gum magnate William Wrigley Jr., bought the Chicago Cubs and moved them to Weeghman Park. The stadium was renamed Cubs Park before getting its permanent name, Wrigley Field, in 1926.
-Tigers add new security measures at ballpark
-Detroit Outlines New Vision For Old Tiger Stadium Site
-No Easy Task Preparing US Cellular Field for Opener

Would Angels Be Willing to Build Own Ballpark?
Is Arte Moreno bluffing, or would he really move the Angels out of Anaheim? That has emerged as a pivotal question as the team and city try to negotiate a deal that would keep the Angels where they are. Moreno, the Angels’ owner, met last month with officials in Tustin about a possible new ballpark there, and said talks with Anaheim officials were “at a stalemate.” Dan Barrett, a sports industry consultant advising the city, told the Anaheim City Council on Tuesday night that a new ballpark could cost $600 million to $700 million. After the meeting, Mayor Tom Tait expressed skepticism that Moreno could strike his best financial deal by abandoning Angel Stadium.
-Coors Field closer to hosting outdoor hockey game
-Astrodome supporters fighting the good fight

-Wrigley Field groundbreaking was 100 years ago

Giants Willing to Share AT&T Park with Oakland A's
With the Oakland A's filing into Scottsdale Stadium for the Cactus League opener, Giants president and CEO Larry Baer acknowledged Wednesday that he could see the two Bay Area teams sharing AT&T Park at some point, but only under one circumstance. "They've got to come up with a long-term plan," Baer said. "Once that's arrived at, then maybe you'll take a step back and say, 'Is there something we can do to be helpful?' As a neighborly thing. "Obviously, they've got to come up with what their plan is and we'll go from there." If the A's need a temporary home as they build a new ballpark, the Giants are open to discussions. But Baer said that there is nothing new on the A's stadium front. He reiterated that the Giants would like the A's to get their own stadium, but not if it's in San Jose. The Giants hold territorial rights in Santa Clara County and have been unwilling to budge.
-Giants hope to bring the Sharks and outdoor hockey to AT&T Park
-Could Angels put Irvine into play for stadium?

-Explosives take down more parts of the Metrodome

Rangers' Stadium Renamed Globe Life Park in Arlington
The Texas Rangers have announced Globe Life, an insurance company, has purchased the naming rights for their stadium in Arlington. The stadium will now be known as Globe Life Park in Arlington.
Globe Life will also make a "substantial commitment" to the Texas Rangers Baseball Foundation to support youth baseball and softball programs in the Rangers’ five-state territory through a grant partnership program, according to Texas Rangers co-chariman Ray Davis. Globe Life and Accident Insurance Company, founded in 1951, is based out of Oklahoma City, Okla., and has over 3.9 million policyholders, according to its website. It is a subsidiary of Torchmark Corporation, based in McKinney, and has 650 employees in McKinney and Oklahoma City. “This agreement makes us a stronger organization--on the field and in our community," said Rangers Co-Chairmen Ray Davis and Bob Simpson in a statement released to media. "It will give us increased flexibility and help us remain competitive from both short-term and long-term perspectives."

-At Yankee Stadium, Rangers Will Share Glamour With Rivals
-SoCal Heat Not Fazing Ice Rink at Dodger Stadium

Braves Select Architect Populus to Design Stadium
The Atlanta Braves have selected the most prolific designer of Major League Baseball stadiums as lead architect for the team’s planned new ballpark in Cobb County.
The Braves’ choice is Kansas City-based Populous, which designed 19 of the 30 MLB stadiums currently in use, a team official confirmed Tuesday. The Braves are in contract negotiations with the firm, team spokeswoman Beth Marshall added. Populous, formerly named HOK Sport, is known for its retro-style ballparks, a trend the firm pioneered with Baltimore’s highly acclaimed Oriole Park at Camden Yards, which opened in 1992. In recent years, Populous designed a range of baseball stadiums, including Marlins Park in Miami, Target Field in Minneapolis and stadiums in New York for the Yankees and Mets.

-At Yankee Stadium, Rangers Will Share Glamour With Rivals
-SoCal Heat Not Fazing Ice Rink at Dodger Stadium

The Outdoor Hockey Success Continues for the NHL
Question whether the league is overplaying its outdoor hand, there is no denying that after a weekend that saw the NHL go outdoors not once but twice in a span of less than 24 hours and 3,000 miles apart that the NHL scored a bigger win than the Rangers did Sunday. After seeing the Winter Classic this year in Michigan with more than 100,000 fans in attendance, the snow flying from start to finish and two Original Six teams doing battle, it seemed almost pointless to repeat the outdoor feat for the NHL. No way could the watered-down games compare to the New Year's Day staple, especially if we were going to get watered-down ice by going to a locale such as Los Angeles. Then the NHL actually hosted games at Dodger Stadium and Yankee Stadium and they went off about as well as the NHL could have hoped.
-At Yankee Stadium, Rangers Will Share Glamour With Rivals
-SoCal Heat Not Fazing Ice Rink at Dodger Stadium

It's History: Metrodome Roof Deflated in 35 Minutes
I
n the end, the old workhorse exhaled its last breath, sagged in the middle and collapsed with a silent and steady heave. It took just 35 minutes Saturday to deflate the Metrodome’s signature fabric roof, providing both a symbolic end of an era as well as a meaningful start to the construction on the new $1 billion Vikings stadium in its place. By April, all traces of the Dome will be erased from the Minneapolis skyline, replaced by a glassy new behemoth in 2016. The scheduled deflation went without a hitch, despite nagging worries about wind and adverse winter weather. Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority Vice Chairman Bill McCarthy called it “a sad and exciting day at the same time. I don’t want to forget what this building has meant to many of us, the Vikings, Twins and Gophers fans and the many high school and college games that have been played here.”
-Closing of the Metrodome: A lot of great Twins memories
-SoCal Heat Not Fazing Ice Rink at Dodger Stadium

Dodgers Unveil More Upgrades to Dodger Stadium
The Dodgers will continue the upgrades on Dodger Stadium that began last winter, including an expansion of the Field Level entrances and relocation of the visiting clubhouse. Plans have been submitted for approval by the city of Los Angeles for the second phase of the project, which is expected to be completed in time for the regular-season home opener April 4. "Dodger Stadium is one of the most fan-friendly and family-oriented venues in all of baseball," said Dodgers president and CEO Stan Kasten in a team release. "Our goal is to ensure that we maintain that elite status while continuing to do everything in our power to bring a world championship to Dodger fans."
-The Hidden Relics of Candlestick Park
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Giants memories remain at Candlestick Park

-Closing of the Metrodome: A lot of great Twins memories
-NHL Stadium Series: Ticket prices lowered for Dodger Stadium game

Oakland Ballpark Backers Tout Waterfront Site
Imagine AT&T Park flanked by giant shipping cranes - that's pretty much the vision A's boosters have for a 38,000-seat ballpark at the Port of Oakland, just west of Jack London Square. The $500 million waterfront ballpark is being proposed by a team led by Clorox chairman and CEO Don Knauss and former Dreyer's Grand Ice Cream boss T. Gary Rogers - with the blessing of Oakland Mayor Jean Quan. "It's one of the two sites we promised Major League Baseball we would offer, and it will be available early next year," Quan told us Friday - the other being the current Coliseum site. "Trust me, Oakland is hot now," Quan said, "and a lot of developers would love that (waterfront) site if it doesn't become a baseball stadium."
-The Hidden Relics of Candlestick Park
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Giants memories remain at Candlestick Park
-Closing of the Metrodome: A lot of great Twins memories
-Oakland ballpark backers tout waterfront site

Metrodome to Deflate for Last Time on January 18th
The Metrodome roof will deflate for the last time next month. Mortenson Construction, the contractor building the new Minnesota Vikings stadium, says Friday it will cut the Metrodome's power on Jan. 18. Company vice president John Wood says the first step after that is to deflate the Teflon and fiberglass roof. The Metrodome's facilities manager tells Minnesota Public Radio News he expects the deflation to only take about 30 minutes. The roof fabric will be cut into small pieces and possibly recycled. Preliminary work has started around the Metrodome, where its replacement will be constructed. The Vikings plan two seasons at the University of Minnesota's stadium. The Minnesota Twins moved out of the Metrdome and into Target Field in April 2010.

Rays Plan Ballpark Improvements for Tropicana Field
The Tampa Bay Rays announced plans Dec. 3 for a major upgrade to Tropicana Field that will significantly enhance the fan experience for the 2014 season. The project will create 360-degree pedestrian circulation around the lower seating bowl at Tropicana Field. The improved circulation will provide easier access to and from ballpark gates, concessions and activity areas throughout the facility. Existing cross-aisles in the lower bowl will be extended from the left and right field foul poles to create a walkway lined with drink rails as it winds toward center field.  "These renovations reflect our constant commitment to providing a first-class gameday experience at Tropicana Field," said Rays Principal Owner Stuart Sternberg. "A visit to the ballpark will be even more enjoyable because of these new features and attractions."
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Rangers get OK for $4 million in ballpark renovations
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Sen. Levin calls Old Tiger Stadium and its legendary players a 'magnet' for redevelopment
-Athletics extend Coliseum lease through 2015

Nationals Sought Tax Money for Retractable Roof
Mayor Vincent C. Gray said Tuesday that Washington Nationals owner Theodore N. Lerner pitched him earlier this year on a pricey plan to have the city build a retractable roof over Nationals Park — a proposal, Gray said, that he swiftly but politely rejected. The private one-on-one meeting took place in the John A. Wilson Building in mid-July and lasted about 15 minutes, Gray said. “What Lerner wanted to talk about was the possibility of a roof on Nationals Park,” the mayor (D) said. “That was it. There was no discussion about how much it was going to cost and no further details. I’ve had no further discussions.”
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Taxpayers on the hook for stadium costs
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Sen. Levin calls Old Tiger Stadium and its legendary players a 'magnet' for redevelopment
-Athletics extend Coliseum lease through 2015

Braves Plan to Build New Stadium by 2017
The Atlanta Braves plan to build a new stadium in Cobb County and move there from Turner Field at the start of the 2017 season, team officials said today. Braves executives John Schuerholz, Mike Plant and Derek Schiller, in a meeting with a small group of reporters, said the new ballpark will be built at the northwest intersection of I-75 and I-285 in the Galleria/Cumberland Mall area. They said the team has “secured” 60 acres of land for the project. The Braves said the stadium is projected to cost $672 million, including parking, land and infrastructure, and will be built in partnership with Cobb County.
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Turner Field to be demolished after Braves leave
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Reaction to Braves moving
-Beach Bowl to Make Debut at Marlins Park Next Year

Demolition Likely for Astrodome After Voters Nix Plan
Houston-area voters have rejected a plan to convert the shuttered Astrodome into a convention center and have likely doomed the iconic stadium to demolition. Tuesday’s referendum would have authorized Harris County to issue up to $217 million in bonds to turn the world’s first multipurpose domed stadium into a giant convention and exhibition space. Early voting returns, as of 9:30 p.m., favor razing the so-called “Eighth Wonder of the World” with 53 percent of the vote going against the referendum. With 67 percent of the precincts reporting in, 89,455 voted against approving the referendum, while 102,708 in favor. Early voting totals also favored razing the facility with 47,190 voting for the referendum and 54,721 voting against.
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Rooftop owners: Wrigley Field test sign obstructs views
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Playoff preparations under way at Tropicana Field
-Beach Bowl to Make Debut at Marlins Park Next Year

Rockies Reveal Renovation Plan for Coors Field
The Rockies and the Denver Metropolitan Stadium District announced Wednesday the next major construction project at Coors Field — an extensive redesign and renovation to the upper right-field seating area and concourse. According to the Rockies, the new party deck area will embrace a "LoDo" theme that includes views of the Rocky Mountains from a rooftop urban setting. Owner Dick Monfort told The Denver Post on Wednesday that much of the money for the project came from a surplus of capital construction funds and also from money the Rockies and the Denver Metropolitan Stadium District received from Aramark and RTD. Aramark is the company that runs the food and beverage concessions at Coors Field. "It's an investment that will help in years to come," Monfort said. "The money is not fungible. It couldn't have been spent on players (because it is connected to stadium improvement). It's one-time money. If we did our work right, it will be something that will generate revenue that can go into the team forever. There are returns."
-Astrodome gets $8 million facelift regardless of fate

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Playoff preparations under way at Tropicana Field
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O.co Coliseum Quick-Change Artists on the Spot

Playoff Run Could Fuel Ballpark in Oakland
Not to put any more pressure on you, Athletics, but there's more at stake in Thursday's game against the Tigers than simply a trip to the American League Championship Series. The future of the ballclub in Oakland might hang in the balance. None of you guys was born and raised in Oakland, and even if the team moves to San Jose, most of you won't be around by the time the move is made, so this might not be at the top of your worry list. But before Thursday night's game, feel free to ignore the advice of team co-owner Lew Wolff, look into the stands, all the way up to the tarpland now filled with real people, and think of the Oakland fans. Think of the city that has been good to the A's and baseball for many decades, a city that could use a break. A slam-bang series against the dreaded Red Sox, especially if it leads to a World Series, might be the tipping point in keeping the A's in Oakland, in a new ballpark. Why would one game, or a couple of thrilling weeks in the postseason, make a difference in the geographical fate of the A's? Well, the people who make the decisions on ballparks - citizens, politicians, investors - are human, with some exceptions. They get caught up in waves of emotion.
-Astrodome gets $8 million facelift regardless of fate

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Playoff preparations under way at Tropicana Field
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O.co Coliseum Quick-Change Artists on the Spot

O.co Coliseum Quick-Change Artists on the Spot
This will be a big weekend at O.co Coliseum for those who excel at speed, strength, agility and veteran savvy. The A's and Raiders games should be interesting, too. In the 221/2 (or so) hours that will separate Saturday night's Game 2 of the A's-Detroit Tigers playoff series and Sunday night's Raiders-San Diego Chargers regular-season NFL game, a crew of several dozen workers and a couple of huge cranes will transform the Coliseum from a house of baseball into the Black Hole. The quick turnaround may seem like a daunting, stressful challenge, but there's a reason these workers seem to subscribe to the old sports axiom, "Act like you've been there before." The Coliseum, built in an era when multipurpose facilities were as fashionable as garage bands and bell bottom pants, is the last remaining stadium that is home to teams from Major League Baseball and the National Football League. Under ideal conditions, it takes a couple of days to switch configurations from one sport to the other.
-Oakland A's owner Lew Wolff makes pitch for downtown ballpark
-Wrigley Field Renovations in Limbo

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Depressing Crowds at Pennant Chasing Ballparks
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Worst Case Scenario Comes True at Busch Stadium

San Francisco Has Had Run of Eccentric Ballparks
Candlestick Park is about to go out with a bang. Soon after the last 49ers game, demolition crews will place charges throughout the stadium, someone will push a button and the great concrete bowl off Jamestown Avenue will implode, an arena that produced 53 years of memories collapsing in just 30 seconds.  Giants fans in particular loved to hate the Stick, with its notorious wind, rowdy patrons and rough environs. But Candlestick was actually one of the tamer entries in a long, proud tradition of weird and wonderful San Francisco ballparks. The first mention of something like baseball in San Francisco took place in 1852, when the Daily Alta California ran an item about "full grown persons engaged very industriously in the game known as town ball." Town ball was the precursor of baseball, a bat-and-ball game played on a square where the players frequently made up their own rules. Even when the game got rules, this lax attitude toward authority and decorous behavior was to continue in San Francisco.
-Oakland A's owner Lew Wolff makes pitch for downtown ballpark
-With Royals’ best season in a decade, attendance at Kauffman Stadium edges up

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Depressing Crowds at Pennant Chasing Ballparks
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Worst Case Scenario Comes True at Busch Stadium

Blue Jays to Host Mets in Games at Olympic Stadium
Baseball is coming back to Olympic Stadium in Montreal. The Toronto Blue Jays will host the New York Mets at Olympic Stadium on March 28-29, 2014 in two pre-season games just before the regular season begins. "We are excited to bring the Blue Jays to Montreal play in Montreal and give the fans a taste of Major League Baseball again. This will be a very meaningful experience knowing the strength and passion of baseball fans in Quebec. We hope that these games will rekindle their interest in the Blue Jays and Major League Baseball," said Toronto Blue Jays president and CEO Paul Beeston. The two teams have faced each other 21 times with the Mets leading the series, 15-6. The Blue Jays have been the home team on 12 occasions, winning six and losing six. The last game between the Jays and the Mets goes back to May 20, 2012, when the Mets won 6-5, at Rogers Centre.
-Jays turf Argos in favor of grass playing surface at Rogers Centre
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Man dies after fall from upper deck of Atlanta ballpark

-MLB Plans to Intervene in Rays Stadium Dispute
-Seating Chart released for NHL Game at Dodger Stadium

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